Uncle Tom
Uncle Tom
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Uncle Tom
Uncle Tom is the title character of Harriet Beecher Stowe's 1852 novel, Uncle Tom's Cabin. The term "Uncle Tom" is also used as a derogatory epithet for

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Uncle Tom Uncle Tom's Cabin character Detail of an illustration from the first book edition of Uncle Tom's Cabin, depicting Uncle Tom as young and muscular.First appearance Uncle Tom's CabinLast appearance Uncle Tom's CabinCreated by Harriet Beecher StoweInformationGender MaleNationality American Part of a series on
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Look up Uncle Tom in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Uncle Tom is the title character of Harriet Beecher Stowe's 1852 novel, Uncle Tom's Cabin.[1] The term "Uncle Tom" is also used as a derogatory epithet for an exceedingly subservient person, particularly when that person is aware of their own lower-class status based on race. The use of the epithet is the result of later works derived from the original novel.

Contents
  • 1 Original characterization and critical evaluations
  • 2 Inspiration
  • 3 Epithet
    • 3.1 History
  • 4 See also
  • 5 Notes
  • 6 References
  • 7 External links
Original characterization and critical evaluations

At the time of the novel's initial publication in 1851, Uncle Tom was a rejection of the existing stereotypes of minstrel shows; Stowe's melodramatic story humanized the suffering of slavery for white audiences by portraying Tom as a Jesus-like figure who is ultimately martyred, beaten to death by a cruel master because he refuses to betray the whereabouts of two women who had escaped from slavery.[2][3] Stowe reversed the gender conventions of slave narratives by juxtaposing Uncle Tom's passivity against the daring of three African American women who escape from slavery.[2]

The novel was both influential and commercially successful, published as a serial from 1851 to 1852 and as a book from 1852 onward.[2][3] An estimated 500,000 copies had sold worldwide by 1853, including unauthorized reprints.[4] Senator Charles Sumner credited Uncle Tom's Cabin for the election of Abraham Lincoln, an opinion that is later echoed in the apocryphal story of Lincoln greeting Stowe with the quip "So you're the little woman who wrote the book that made this great war!" (see American Civil War)[2][5] Frederick Douglass praised the novel as "a flash to light a million camp fires in front of the embattled hosts of slavery".[2] Despite Douglass's enthusiasm, an anonymous 1852 reviewer for William Lloyd Garrison's publication The Liberator suspected a racial double standard in the idealization of Uncle Tom:

Uncle Tom's character is sketched with great power and rare religious perception. It triumphantly exemplifies the nature, tendency, and results of Christian non-resistance. We are curious to know whether Mrs. Stowe is a believer in the duty of non-resistance for the White man, under all possible outrage and peril, as for the Black man… Talk not of overcoming evil with good—it is madness! Talk not of peacefully submitting to chains and stripes—it is base servility! Talk not of servants being obedient to their masters—let the blood of tyrants flow! How is this to be explained or reconciled? Is there one law of submission and non-resistance for the Black man, and another of rebellion and conflict for the white man? When it is the whites who are trodden in the dust, does Christ justify them in taking up arms to vindicate their rights? And when it is the blacks who are thus treated, does Christ require them to be patient, harmless, long-suffering, and forgiving? Are there two Christs?[6]

James Weldon Johnson, a prominent figure of the Harlem Renaissance, expresses an antipathetic opinion in his autobiography:

For my part, I was never an admirer of Uncle Tom, nor of his type of goodness; but I believe that there were lots of old Negroes as foolishly good as he.

In 1949, American writer James Baldwin rejected the emasculation of the title character "robbed of his humanity and divested of his sex" as the price of spiritual salvation for a dark-skinned man in a fiction whose African-American characters, in Baldwin's view, were invariably two dimensional stereotypes.[2][7] To Baldwin, Stowe was closer to a pamphleteer than a novelist and her artistic vision was fatally marred by polemics and racism that manifested especially in her handling of the title character.[7] Stowe had stated that her sons had wept when she first read them the scene of Uncle Tom's death, but after Baldwin's essay it ceased being respectable to accept the melodrama of the Uncle Tom story.[2] Uncle Tom became what critic Linda Williams describes as "an epithet of servility" and the novel's reputation plummeted until feminist critics led by Jane Tompkins reassessed the tale's female characters.[2]

According to Debra J. Rosenthal, in an introduction to a collection of critical appraisals for the Routledge Literary Sourcebook on Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin, overall reactions have been mixed with some critics praising the novel for affirming the humanity of the African American characters and for the risks Stowe assumed in taking a very public stand against slavery before abolitionism had become a socially acceptable cause, and others criticizing the very limited terms upon which those characters' humanity was affirmed and the artistic shortcomings of political melodrama.[8]

Inspiration

A specific impetus for the novel was the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850, which imposed heavy fines upon law enforcement personnel in Northern states if they refused to assist the return of people who escaped from slavery.[3][9] The new law also stripped African Americans of the right to request a jury trial or to testify on their own behalf, even if they were legally free, whenever a single claimant presented an affidavit of ownership.[9] The same law authorized a $1000 fine and six months imprisonment for anyone who knowingly harbored or assisted a fugitive slave.[9] These terms infuriated Stowe, so the novel was written, read, and debated as a political abolitionist tract.[3]

Stowe drew inspiration for the Uncle Tom character from several sources. The best-known of these was Josiah Henson, an ex-slave whose autobiography, The Life of Josiah Henson, Formerly a Slave, Now an Inhabitant of Canada, as Narrated by Himself, was originally published in 1849 and later republished in two extensively revised editions after the publication of Uncle Tom's Cabin.[10] Henson was enslaved at birth in 1789.[10] He became a Christian at age eighteen and began preaching.[10] Henson attempted to purchase his freedom for $450, but after selling his personal assets to raise $350 and signing a promissory note for the remainder Henson's owner raised the price to $1000; Henson was unable to prove that the original agreement had been for a lesser amount.[10] Shortly afterward Henson was ordered on a trip south to New Orleans. When he learned that he was to be sold there, he obtained a weapon. He contemplated murdering his white companions with the weapon, but decided against violence because his Christian morals forbade it.[10] A sudden illness in one of his companions forced their return to Kentucky, and shortly afterward Henson escaped north with his family, settling in Canada where he became a civic leader.[10]

Stowe read the first edition of Henson's narrative and later confirmed that she had incorporated elements from it into Uncle Tom's Cabin.[10] Kentucky and New Orleans figure in both Henson's narrative and the novel's settings, and some other story elements are similar.[10]

In the public imagination, however, Henson became synonymous with Uncle Tom.[10] After Stowe's death her son and grandson claimed she and Henson had met before Uncle Tom's Cabin was written, but the chronology does not hold up to scrutiny and she probably drew material only from his published autobiography.[10]

Epithet

In short terms, Uncle Tom is labeled to persons, similar to snitch or betrayer, whose motive is driven by acceptance that doing slavery was just how the (antebellum) Southern society worked, whether the acceptance is spontaneous or coerced.

The term "Uncle Tom" is used as a derogatory epithet for an excessively subservient person, particularly when that person perceives their own lower-class status based on race. It is similarly used to negatively describe a person who betrays their own group by participating in its oppression, whether or not they do so willingly.[1][11] The term has also, with more intended neutrality, been applied in psychology in the form "Uncle Tom syndrome", a term for the use of subservience, appeasement and passivity to cope with intimidation and threats.

The popular negative connotations of "Uncle Tom" have largely been attributed to the numerous derivative works inspired by Uncle Tom's Cabin in the decade after its release, rather than the original novel itself, whose title character is a more positive figure.[2] These works lampooned and distorted the portrayal of Uncle Tom with politically loaded overtones.[4]

History Uncle Tom, from an 1885 magic lantern series.

American copyright law before 1856 did not give novel authors any control over derivative stage adaptations, so Stowe neither approved the adaptations nor profited from them.[12] Minstrel show retellings in particular, usually performed by white men in blackface, tended to be derisive and pro-slavery, transforming Uncle Tom from Christian martyr to a fool or an apologist for slavery.[4]

Adapted theatrical performances of the novel, called Tom Shows, remained in continual production in the United States for at least 80 years.[12] These representations had a lasting cultural impact and influenced the pejorative nature of the term Uncle Tom in later popular use.[4]

Although not all minstrel depictions of Uncle Tom were negative, the dominant version developed into a stock character very different from Stowe's hero.[4][13] Stowe's Uncle Tom was a muscular and virile man who refused to obey when ordered to beat other slaves; the stock character of minstrel shows became a shuffling asexual individual with a receding hairline and graying hair.[13] To Jo-Ann Morgan, author of Uncle Tom's Cabin as Visual Culture, these shifting representations undermined the subversive layers of Stowe's original characterization by redefining Uncle Tom until he fit within prevailing racist norms.[12] Particularly after the Civil War, as the political thrust of the novel which had arguably helped to precipitate that war became obsolete to actual political discourse, popular depictions of the title character recast him within the apologetics of the Lost Cause of the Confederacy.[12] The virile father of the abolitionist serial and first book edition degenerated into a decrepit old man, and with that transformation the character lost the capacity for resistance that had originally given meaning to his choices.[12][13] Stowe never meant Uncle Tom to be a derided name, but the term as a pejorative has developed based on how later versions of the character, stripped of his strength, were depicted on stage.[14]

Claire Parfait, author of The Publishing History of Uncle Tom's Cabin, 1852–2002, opines that "the many alterations in retellings of the Uncle Tom story demonstrate an impulse to correct the retellers' perceptions of its flaws" and "the capacity of the novel to irritate and rankle, even a century and a half after its first publication".[3]

See also
  • Acting white
  • House Negro
  • Jump Jim Crow
  • List of ethnic slurs
  • The Brothers Brothers
  • Race traitor
  • Respectability politics
  • Stepin Fetchit
  • Sycophant
  • Shoneen
Notes
  1. ^ a b "Uncle Tom". Merriam-Webster Dictionary..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"\"""\"""'""'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i Williams, Linda (2002). Playing the Race Card: Melodramas of Black and White from Uncle Tom to O.J. Simpson. Princeton University Press. pp. 7, 30–31, 47–62. ISBN 978-0-691-10283-2. Retrieved 2009-04-16.
  3. ^ a b c d e Parfait, Claire (2007). The publishing history of Uncle Tom's cabin, 1852–2002. Ashgate Publishing, Ltd. pp. 1–2, 6. ISBN 978-0-7546-5514-5. Retrieved 2009-04-16.
  4. ^ a b c d e Meer, Sarah (2005). Uncle Tom mania: slavery, minstrelsy, and transatlantic culture in the 1850s. University of Georgia Press. pp. 1–4, 9, 14–15. ISBN 978-0-8203-2737-2. Retrieved 2009-04-16.
  5. ^ R., Vollaro, Daniel (2009-01-01). "Lincoln, Stowe, and the 'Little Woman/Great War' Story: The Making, and Breaking, of a Great American Anecdote". Journal of the Abraham Lincoln Association. 30 (1). ISSN 1945-7987.
  6. ^ Untitled review, republished in A Routledge literary sourcebook on Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's cabin by Debra J. Rosenthal. Routledge. 2004 . p. 35. ISBN 978-0-415-23473-3. Retrieved 2009-04-17.
  7. ^ a b Baldwin, James (2006) . Everybody's Protest Novel (partial republication). Harvard University Press. pp. 118–121. ISBN 978-0-674-02352-9. Retrieved 2009-04-17.
  8. ^ Rosenthal, Debra J. (2004). A Routledge literary sourcebook on Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's cabin. Routledge. pp. 30–31. ISBN 978-0-415-23473-3. Retrieved 2009-04-17.
  9. ^ a b c "The Fugitive Slave Act". U.S. Constitution Online. Retrieved 2008-10-03.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Winks, Robin W. (2003). Autobiography of Josiah Henson: An Inspiration for Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom (introduction). Courier Dover Publications. pp. v–vi, x–xi, xviii–xix. ISBN 978-0-486-42863-5. Retrieved 2009-04-16.
  11. ^ "Uncle Tom". Wordnet.princeton.edu. Retrieved April 24, 2009.
  12. ^ a b c d e Morgan, Jo-Ann (2007). Uncle Tom's cabin as visual culture. University of Missouri Press. pp. 1–5, 11–12, 17–19. ISBN 978-0-8262-1715-8. Retrieved 2009-04-17.
  13. ^ a b c Richardson, Riché (2007). Black masculinity and the U.S. South: from Uncle Tom to gangsta. University of Georgia Press. p. 3. ISBN 978-0-8203-2890-4. Retrieved 2009-04-16.
  14. ^ Keyes, Allison (2002-11-29). "NPR: A New Look at 'Uncle Tom's Cabin'". The Tavis Smiley Show. NPR. Retrieved 2008-01-09.
References
  • Osofsky, Gilbert, ed. (1969). Puttin' On Ole Massa: The Slave Narratives of Henry Bibb, William Wells Brown, and Solomon Northup. Harper & Row. ISBN 978-0-06-131432-2.
  • Mohammad Ali (2009). Thrilla in Manilla (Documentary). USA: HBO.
External links
  • An article on the Uncle Tom caricature
  • An article from EveryGirls 1931 by Olive Burns Kirby
  • v
  • t
  • e
Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's CabinCharacters
  • Uncle Tom
Film adaptations
  • Uncle Tom's Cabin (1910)
  • Uncle Tom's Cabin (1918)
  • Uncle Tom's Cabin (1927)
  • Uncle Tom's Cabin (1965)
Related works
  • A Key to Uncle Tom's Cabin
  • Tom show
Animation
  • Hittin' the Trail for Hallelujah Land (1931)
  • Mickey's Mellerdrammer (1933)
  • Uncle Tom's Bungalow (1937)
  • Uncle Tom's Cabaña (1947)
  • Southern Fried Rabbit (1953)
Anti-Tom literature
  • Aunt Phillis's Cabin
  • The Planter's Northern Bride
  • Little Eva: The Flower of the South
  • Uncle Tom's Cabin As It Is
  • Uncle Robin's Cabin
  • "Uncle Tom's Cabin" Contrasted with Buckingham Hall, the Planter's Home
  • Ellen; or, The Fanatic's Daughter
  • The Ebony Idol
  • Frank Freeman's Barber Shop
  • The North and the South; or, Slavery and Its Contrasts
  • Mr. Frank, the Underground Mail-Agent
  • The Cabin and Parlor; or, Slaves and Masters
  • The Black Gauntlet
  • White Acre vs. Black Acre
  • Antifanaticism: A Tale of the South
  • The Lofty and the Lowly, or Good in All and None All Good
Related
  • Josiah Henson
    • 1849 autobiography
    • Uncle Tom's Cabin Historic Site
  • The Birth of a Nation
  • Dimples
  • Tit for Tat
  • Uncle Tom syndrome
  • Underground Railroad
  • The National Era
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Non-fiction books
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  • Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (1845)
  • The Life of Josiah Henson (1849)
  • Twelve Years a Slave (1853)
  • My Bondage and My Freedom (1855)
  • Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861)
  • The Underground Railroad Records (1872)
  • Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (1881)
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Fiction/novels
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  • Our Nig (1859)
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  • Roots: The Saga of an American Family (1976)
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  • Beloved (1987)
  • Middle Passage (1990)
  • Queen: The Story of an American Family (1993)
  • Hang a Thousand Trees with Ribbons (1996)
  • Ama: A Story of the Atlantic Slave Trade (2001)
  • Walk Through Darkness (2002)
  • The Known World (2003)
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  • Copper Sun (2006)
  • The Book of Negroes (2007)
  • The Underground Railroad (2016)
Young adult books
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  • I, Juan de Pareja (1965)
  • The Slave-Girl from Jerusalem (2007)
Essay
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  • A Key to Uncle Tom's Cabin (1853)
Plays
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  • The Octoroon (1859)
Related
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  • Caribbean literature
  • Films featuring slavery
  • Songs of the Underground Railroad
  • Book of Negroes (1783)
  • Cotton Plantation Record and Account Book (1847)
  • Slave Songs of the United States (1867)
  • Amazing Grace: An Anthology of Poems about Slavery (2002)
  • The Hemingses of Monticello (2008)
Documentaries
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  • Frederick Douglass and the White Negro (2008)
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  • Colored
  • Cushi
  • Golliwog
  • House Negro
  • Jim Crow
  • Kaffir
  • Macaca
  • Mammy
  • Negro
  • Nigga
  • Niggardly
  • Nigger
  • Pickaninny
  • Rastus
  • Queen/Queenie
  • Sambo
  • Tar-Baby
  • Uncle Tom
  • Wog
Americans
(North & South)Mixed
  • Beaner (Mexicans)
  • Greaser
  • Naco
  • Pocho (non-Spanish speaking Hispanics)
  • Spic
  • Wetback
Indigenous
  • Cholo (Mestizos)
  • Eskimo (Inuit)
  • Half-breed (Métis)
  • Indian (Native American/First Nations)
  • Redskin (Native American/First Nations)
  • Squaw (Native American women)
Whites
  • Coonass (Cajuns)
  • Cracker
  • Gringo
  • Haole
  • Hillbilly
  • Peckerwood
  • Redneck
  • Swamp Yankee
  • White trash
  • Yank / Yankee
Others
  • Canuck (Canadians)
  • Coonass (Cajuns)
  • Newfie (Newfoundlander)
AsiansEast AsiansGeneral
  • Banana (westernized East Asians)
  • Gook
Chinese
  • Ah Beng
  • American-born Chinese (ABC)
  • Chinaman
  • Chink
  • Ching chong
  • Coolie
  • Jook-sing (overseas/westernized Chinese)
  • Sangokujin (also Koreans)
  • Shina
Japanese
  • Jap
  • Jjokbari
  • Nip
  • Xiao Riben
Koreans
  • Gaoli bangzi
  • Simida
  • Sangokujin (also Chinese)
South AsiansGeneral
  • American-Born Confused Desi (ABCD)
  • Chandala
  • Coolie
Bengali Hindus
  • Bongal
  • Dkhar
  • Malaun
Indians
  • Chinki (Northeast Indians)
  • Coolie
  • Keling (Maritime Southeast Asian-origin Indians)
Pakistanis
  • Paki
Romani
  • Didicoy
  • Nawar
  • Zott
  • Gypsies
EuropeansGeneral
  • Ang mo
  • Bule
  • Farang
  • Guizi
  • Gweilo
  • Honky
  • Mat Salleh
  • Redleg
  • Trailer trash
  • Wasi'chu
  • Wigger
  • Wog
Albanians
  • Šiptar
  • Turco-Albanians
British
  • Limey (English people)
  • Taffy (Welsh people)
  • Teuchter (Scottish Highlanders)
Dutch
  • Cheesehead
Finns
  • Chukhna
  • China Swede
  • Finnjävel
French
  • Cheese-eating surrender monkeys
  • Frog
Germans
  • Kraut
Greeks
  • Grecoman
Irish
  • Fenian (Republicans)
  • Knacker (Irish Travellers)
  • Pikey (Irish Travellers)
  • Shoneen (Anglophile Irish)
  • Taig (Irish Catholics)
Italians
  • Goombah
  • Guido
  • Wop
  • Terrone (South Italians)
  • Polentone (North Italians)
Poles
  • Polack
Russians
  • Moskal
  • Tibla
Serbs
  • Shkije
  • Vlachs
Spaniards
  • Xarnego
Ukrainians
  • Khokhol
Welsh
  • Sheep shagger
  • Taffy
Others
  • Bulgarophiles (Macedonians and Serbs)
  • Serbomans (Macedonians and Bulgarians)
  • Yestonians (Russified Estonians)
Arabs
  • Rafida (Shi'ites)
  • Raghead
  • Wog
Jews
  • Christ killer
  • Jewish-American princess (JAP)
  • Kafir
  • Khazar (Ashkenazi Jews)
  • Kike
  • Marrano (conversos/crypto-Jews)
  • Wog
  • Yekke (German Jews)
  • Yid
  • Zhyd / Zhydovka
  • Żydokomuna
Oceanians
  • Hori (Māori)
  • Kanaka (Pacific Islander)
  • Kanake (Polynesians)
Turks
  • Mongol
Outsiders
  • Ajam (non-Arabs)
  • Barbarian
  • Fresh off the boat/F.O.B. (immigrant)
  • Gaijin (non-Japanese)
  • Goy (non-Jew)
  • Kafir
  • Reffo/Balt (Non-Anglo immigrant to Australia)
  • Shegetz (non-Jewish boy or man) (pl. Shkutzim)
  • Shiksa (non-Jewish woman)
  • v
  • t
  • e
African American caricatures and stereotypesStereotypes
  • Angry Black Woman
  • Baby mama
  • Black American princess
  • Black brute
  • Black Buck
  • Black matriarchy
  • Criminal black man
  • Magical Negro
  • Mammy archetype
  • Video vixen
  • Welfare queen
  • Watermelon stereotype
Caricatures
  • Angelfood McSpade
  • Bigger Hair
  • Blackface
  • Coon Chicken Inn
  • Coon song
  • Golliwog
  • Rastus
Other
  • Black doll
  • Miss Ann
  • Mister Charlie
  • House Negro
  • Uncle Tom
  • Black people in comics
  • Colored people's time
  • Ghettopoly
  • Life as a BlackMan


Uncle Tom: From Martyr to Traitor
Uncle Tom: From Martyr to Traitor
Uncle Tom charts the dramatic cultural transformation of perhaps the most controversial literary character in American history. From his origins as the heroic, Christ-like protagonist of Harriet Beecher Stowe's anti-slavery novel, the best-selling book of the nineteenth century after the Bible, Uncle Tom has become a widely recognized epithet for a black person deemed so subservient to whites that he betrays his race. Readers have long noted that Stowe's character is not the traitorous sycophant that his name connotes today. Adena Spingarn traces his evolution in the American imagination, offering the first comprehensive account of a figure central to American conversations about race and racial representation from 1852 to the present. We learn of the radical political potential of the novel's many theatrical spinoffs even in the Jim Crow era, Uncle Tom's breezy disavowal by prominent voices of the Harlem Renaissance, and a developing critique of "Uncle Tom roles" in Hollywood. Within the stubborn American binary of black and white, citizens have used this rhetorical figure to debate the boundaries of racial difference and the legacy of slavery. Through Uncle Tom, black Americans have disputed various strategies for racial progress and defined the most desirable and harmful images of black personhood in literature and popular culture.

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$30.97
-$9.03(-23%)



Uncle Tom's Cabin
Uncle Tom's Cabin
Uncle Tom's Cabin; or, Life Among the Lowly, is an anti-slavery novel by American author Harriet Beecher Stowe. Published in 1852, the novel "helped lay the groundwork for the Civil War", according to Will Kaufman. Stowe, a Connecticut-born teacher at the Hartford Female Seminary and an active abolitionist, featured the character of Uncle Tom, a long-suffering black slave around whom the stories of other characters revolve. The sentimental novel depicts the reality of slavery while also asserting that Christian love can overcome something as destructive as enslavement of fellow human beings. Uncle Tom's Cabin was the best-selling novel of the 19th century and the second best-selling book of that century, following the Bible. It is credited with helping fuel the abolitionist cause in the 1850s. In the first year after it was published, 300,000 copies of the book were sold in the United States; one million copies in Great Britain. In 1855, three years after it was published, it was called "the most popular novel of our day." The impact attributed to the book is great, reinforced by a story that when Abraham Lincoln met Stowe at the start of the Civil War, Lincoln declared, "So this is the little lady who started this great war." The quote is apocryphal; it did not appear in print until 1896, and it has been argued that "The long-term durability of Lincoln's greeting as an anecdote in literary studies and Stowe scholarship can perhaps be explained in part by the desire among many contemporary intellectuals ... to affirm the role of literature as an agent of social change."

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$9.25
-$1.74(-16%)



The Annotated Uncle Tom's Cabin (The Annotated Books)
The Annotated Uncle Tom's Cabin (The Annotated Books)
Henry Louis Gates Jr. redefines Uncle Tom's Cabin with this seminal interpretation of the great American novel. Declared worthless and dehumanizing by James Baldwin in 1949, Uncle Tom's Cabin has lacked literary credibility for fifty years. Now, in a ringing refutation of Baldwin, Henry Louis Gates Jr. demonstrates the literary transcendence of Harriet Beecher Stowe's masterpiece. Uncle Tom's Cabin, first published in 1852, galvanized the American public as no other work of fiction has ever done. The editors animate pre-Civil War life with rich insights into the lives of slaves, abolitionists, and the American reading public. Examining the lingering effects of the novel, they provide new insights into emerging race-relation, women's, gay, and gender issues. With reproductions of rare prints, posters, and photographs, this book is also one of the most thorough anthologies of Uncle Tom images up to the present day.

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$31.99
-$7.96(-20%)



Uncle Tom's Cabin
Uncle Tom's Cabin
Uncle Tom's Cabin; or, Life Among the Lowly, is an anti-slavery novel by American author Harriet Beecher Stowe. Published in 1852, the novel "helped lay the groundwork for the Civil War", according to Will Kaufman. Stowe, a Connecticut-born teacher at the Hartford Female Seminary and an active abolitionist, featured the character of Uncle Tom, a long-suffering black slave around whom the stories of other characters revolve. The sentimental novel depicts the reality of slavery while also asserting that Christian love can overcome something as destructive as enslavement of fellow human beings. Uncle Tom's Cabin was the best-selling novel of the 19th century and the second best-selling book of that century, following the Bible. It is credited with helping fuel the abolitionist cause in the 1850s. In the first year after it was published, 300,000 copies of the book were sold in the United States; one million copies in Great Britain. In 1855, three years after it was published, it was called "the most popular novel of our day." The impact attributed to the book is great, reinforced by a story that when Abraham Lincoln met Stowe at the start of the Civil War, Lincoln declared, "So this is the little lady who started this great war." The quote is apocryphal; it did not appear in print until 1896, and it has been argued that "The long-term durability of Lincoln's greeting as an anecdote in literary studies and Stowe scholarship can perhaps be explained in part by the desire among many contemporary intellectuals ... to affirm the role of literature as an agent of social change." The book and the plays it inspired helped popularize a number of stereotypes about black people. These include the affectionate, dark-skinned "mammy"; the "pickaninny" stereotype of black children; and the "Uncle Tom", or dutiful, long-suffering servant faithful to his white master or mistress. In recent years, the negative associations with Uncle Tom's Cabin have, to an extent, overshadowed the historical impact of the book as a "vital antislavery tool."

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$6.00
-$3.99(-40%)



A Key to Uncle Tom's Cabin: Presenting the Original Facts and Documents Upon Which the Story Is Founded
A Key to Uncle Tom's Cabin: Presenting the Original Facts and Documents Upon Which the Story Is Founded
"I highly recommend reading this supplement in conjunction with Ms. Stowe's novel to gain a better understanding of the history of our nation." — The Literary SouthIn 1852 Harriet Beecher Stowe published Uncle Tom's Cabin, an instant classic that received overwhelming acclaim by Northerners and other abolitionist readers. Southerners, conversely, strongly denied the novel's accuracy. The following year Stowe answered pro-slavery critics with this unique bestseller, a meticulous and thoughtful defense of her work, which cites real-life equivalents to her characters.Southern readers were further incensed by this follow-up volume, their wrath in no small part inflamed by a Yankee woman's presuming to tell men what to think. A critical aspect of Stowe's Key is her critique of the law's support of not only the institution of slavery but also the mistreatment of individual slaves. As in the original novel, her challenge extends beyond slavery to the law itself. American society's first widely read political novel, Uncle Tom's Cabin influenced the development of the nation's literature, particularly in terms of protest writing. This supplement to the novel offers valuable insights into a historical and literary landmark.

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$6.00
-$6.95(-54%)



Uncle Tom's Cabin (Third Edition) (Norton Critical Editions)
Uncle Tom's Cabin (Third Edition)  (Norton Critical Editions)
“Elizabeth Ammons has produced a first-rate Norton Critical Edition with Uncle Tom’s Cabin.” ―Mason I. Lowance, Jr., University of Massachusetts Amherst  “I will definitely use this edition again. The critical materials at the end of the book helped my students to have informed, productive class discussions.”  ―Heidi Oberholtzer Lee, University of Notre DameThis Norton Critical Edition includes:The 1852 first book edition, accompanied by Elizabeth Ammons’s preface, note on the text, and explanatory annotations.Twenty-two illustrations.A rich selection of historical documents on slavery and abolitionism.Seventeen critical reviews spanning more than 160 years.A Chronology, A Brief Time Line of Slavery in America, and an updated Selected Bibliography.About the SeriesRead by more than 12 million students over fifty-five years, Norton Critical Editions set the standard for apparatus that is right for undergraduate readers. The three-part format―annotated text, contexts, and criticism―helps students to better understand, analyze, and appreciate the literature, while opening a wide range of teaching possibilities for instructors. Whether in print or in digital format, Norton Critical Editions provide all the resources students need.

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$15.00


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