Roosevelt Island
Roosevelt Island
Damnation Island: Poor, Sick, Mad, and Criminal in 19th-Century New York
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“A riveting character-driven dive into 19th-century New York and the extraordinary history of Blackwell’s Island.” —Laurie Gwen Shapiro, author of The Stowaway: A Young Man’s Extraordinary Adventure to Antarctica On a two-mile stretch of land in New York’s East River, a 19th-century horror story was unfolding . . . Today we call it Roosevelt Island. Then, it was Blackwell’s, site of a lunatic asylum, two prisons, an almshouse, and a number of hospitals. Conceived as the most modern, humane incarceration facility the world ever seen, Blackwell’s Island quickly became, in the words of a visiting Charles Dickens, “a lounging, listless madhouse.” In the first contemporary investigative account of Blackwell’s, Stacy Horn tells this chilling narrative through the gripping voices of the island’s inhabitants, as well as the period’s officials, reformers, and journalists, including the celebrated Nellie Bly. Digging through city records, newspaper articles, and archival reports, Horn brings this forgotten history alive: there was terrible overcrowding; prisoners were enlisted to care for the insane; punishment was harsh and unfair; and treatment was nonexistent. Throughout the book, we return to the extraordinary Reverend William Glenney French as he ministers to Blackwell’s residents, battles the bureaucratic mazes of the Department of Correction and a corrupt City Hall, testifies at salacious trials, and in his diary wonders about man’s inhumanity to man. In Damnation Island, Stacy Horn shows us how far we’ve come in caring for the least fortunate among us—and reminds us how much work still remains.
 
Roosevelt Island (Images of America)
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Roosevelt Island captures the fascinating and sometimes curious history of an island located halfway between Manhattan and Queens in the East River. In 1824, the city of New York purchased Blackwell's Island, later Welfare Island, as a site for its lunatic asylum, penitentiary, workhouses, and almshouses. In the years that followed, the island was a temporary home for several of New York City's famous and infamous. William Marcy Tweed, better known as "Boss Tweed," was imprisoned at the penitentiary in the 1870s. Mae West was incarcerated in 1927 at the Workhouse for Women after her appearance in a play called Sex. After many institutions were closed or relocated, Welfare Island was virtually ignored until 1973, when it was reborn as Roosevelt Island, which is now a model planned community and thriving home to almost ten thousand people.
 
Island of Vice: Theodore Roosevelt's Quest to Clean Up Sin-Loving New York
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In the 1890s, young cocksure Theodore Roosevelt, years before the White House, was appointed police commissioner of corrupt, pleasure-loving New York, then teeming with 40,000 prostitutes, illegal casinos and all-night dance halls. The Harvard-educated Roosevelt, with a reformer’s zeal, tried to wipe out the city’s vice and corruption. He went head-to-head with Tammany Hall, took midnight rambles looking for derelict cops, banned barroom drinking on Sundays and tried to convince 2 million New Yorkers to enjoy wholesome family fun.  The city rebelled big time; cartoonists lampooned him on the front page; his own political party abandoned him but Roosevelt never backed down. Island of Vice delivers a rollicking narrative history of Roosevelt’s embattled tenure, pitting the seedy against the saintly, and the city against its would-be savior.
 
The Queensboro Bridge (Images of America: New York)
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Opened in 1909, the Queensboro Bridge is the longest bridge spanning the East River. The bridge had an immediate and profound effect on the development of Queens from a largely rural area into a bedroom and working community. With its graceful symmetry, the bridge has long been a source of inspiration for artists, songwriters, and authors. Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel made it an icon for the 1960s with the song “The 59th Street Bridge Song (Feelin’ Groovy),” and more recently it was featured in the movie Spiderman. Through historic photographs, The Queensboro Bridge documents the creation of this cultural icon and its contributions to the history of New York.
 
Building: Louis I. Kahn at Roosevelt Island: Photographs by Barney Kulok
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In September 2011, Barney Kulok was granted permission to create photographs at the construction site of Louis I. Kahn’s Four Freedoms Park in New York City, commissioned in 1970 as a memorial to Franklin D. Roosevelt. The last design Kahn completed before his untimely death in 1974, Four Freedoms Park remained an unrealized work by one of the masters of twentieth-century architecture. Forty years after the original commission, it was finally completed in 2012. Unbuilt is at once a historical record and a multilayered visual investigation of form and the subtleties of texture--elements that were of fundamental importance to Kahn’s approach . As architect Steven Holl writes, “Kulok’s photographs free the subject matter from a literal interpretation of the site. They stand as ‘Equivalents’ to the words about material, light and shadow that Louis Kahn often spoke.”
 
The Three Graces of Val-Kill: Eleanor Roosevelt, Marion Dickerman, and Nancy Cook in the Place They Made Their Own
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The Three Graces of Val-Kill changes the way we think about Eleanor Roosevelt. Emily Wilson examines what she calls the most formative period in Roosevelt's life, from 1922 to 1936, when she cultivated an intimate friendship with Marion Dickerman and Nancy Cook, who helped her build a cottage on the Val-Kill Creek in Hyde Park on the Roosevelt family land. In the early years, the three women--the "three graces," as Franklin Delano Roosevelt called them--were nearly inseparable and forged a female-centered community for each other, for family, and for New York's progressive women. Examining this network of close female friends gives readers a more comprehensive picture of the Roosevelts and Eleanor's burgeoning independence in the years that marked Franklin's rise to power in politics. Wilson takes care to show all the nuances and complexities of the women's relationship, which blended the political with the personal. Val-Kill was not only home to Eleanor Roosevelt but also a crucial part of how she became one of the most admired American political figures of the twentieth century. In Wilson's telling, she emerges out of the shadows of monumental histories and documentaries as a woman in search of herself.
 
Audubon Guide to the National Wildlife Refuges: California&HI: California, Hawaii, and Midway Island (Audubon Guides to the National Wildlife Refuges)
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The state of California, which comprises more ecosystems than most nations of the world, contains nearly three dozen national wildlife refuges, from the seal-dotted Farallon Islands to the sidewinder-friendly Coachella Valley National Wildlife Refuge in the heart of the Mojave Desert. Of these refuges, 19 are open to the public. Hawaii, which has suffered so much ecological devastation in the last century, has a vast complex of public and closed reserves taking in the tropical rainforest of Mauna Kea and far-flung, remote coral atolls. Naturalist Loren MacArthur guides his readers through these all-too-uncommon places, providing notes on the reserves' histories and rosters of inhabitants, from the rare Hawaiian duck to the abundant bald eagles of the Klamath Basin. Nature aficionados planning a journey to the Far West will want to have this eminently useful guidebook close at hand--and you could do far worse than to plan a vacation around the places about which MacArthur writes. --Gregory McNamee
 
Life of Lorena Hickok E. R.'s Friend
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Faber, Doris, Life Of Lorena Hickok, The: E.R.'s Friend
 
Campobello: Roosevelt's Beloved Island
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Lovely book about Campobello Island
 
USA Houses Rivers Bridges New York City Roosevelt Island Cities characteristic tourist souvenir Furniture & Decorations magnet fridge magnets
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High quality,Makes your fridge look cool and uniformed.We will try our best to make you have a happy shopping experience.
 
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