Sinai
Sinai

Sinai: Egypt's Linchpin, Gaza's Lifeline, Israel's Nightmare
Click Here to view in augmented reality
Enclosed by the Suez Canal and bordering Gaza and Israel, Egypt's rugged Sinai Peninsula has been the cornerstone of the Egyptian-Israeli peace accords, yet its internal politics and security have remained largely under media blackout. While the international press descended on the capital Cairo in January 2011, Sinai's armed rebellion was ignored. The regime lost control of the peninsula in a matter of days and, since then, unprecedented chaos has reigned and the Islamist insurgency has gathered pace. In this crucial analysis, Mohannad Sabry argues that Egypt's shortsighted security approach has continually proven to be a failure. Decades of flawed policies have exacerbated immense social and economic problems, and maintained a superficial stability under which arms trafficking, the smuggling tunnels, and militancy could silently thrive-and finally prevail following the overthrow of Mubarak.Sinai is vital reading for scholars, journalists, policy makers, and all those concerned by the plunge of one of the Middle East's most critical regions into turmoil.
 
Sinai: The Site and the History
Click Here to view in augmented reality
The Sinai peninsula--a fabled triangle of land squeezed between Africa and Asia--harbors a rich deposit of cultural history. For many centuries, Sinai has served as a pivotal transit station, a lively route of caravans, armies, missionaries, and pilgrimages, and a military shield for Egypt. Sinai is also known as the crossroads of the world's three major religions: the site of Moses' exodus, it has subsequently been the entry point for Christianity's and Islam's spread into Africa and Asia. Formerly isolated from the Egyptian mainland, Sinai is today poised on the threshold of new era. After regaining Sinai from Israel, Egypt encouraged Sinai's integration with the motherland, emphasizing its potential for tourism. Sinai: The Site and the History accordingly provides a point of reference from which this land can be discovered and rediscovered. The work of a distinguished group of journalists and scholars, with over 60 stunning color photographs, Sinai provides a comprehensive picture of the region: its breathtaking geography, its remarkable secular and religious history, and the culture and customs of its Bedouin peoples.
 
Sinai: Landscape and Nature in Egypt's Wilderness
Click Here to view in augmented reality
Sinai's allure is legendary. Its spectacular landscapes, thriving flora and fauna, and unique history, the store of centuries, have long held sway in the imagination of millions. The high mountains and wadis of the peninsula's south provide the fertile soil that feeds some of Egypt's highest diversity of plants, while foxes, vipers, lizards, and tortoises are just some of the animals that make their home in the north, which is characterized by lagoons and vast dunes of soft sand. Sinai: Landscape and Nature in Egypt's Wilderness transports us to the haunting grandeur of this peninsula with 150 breathtaking full-color photographs. Omar Attum's discerning eye shows us blood-red mountains, animals in natural repose and habitat, solitary trees and flowers, and fugitive strips of water, conveying stark beauty and enormous vulnerability, an abundance of life yet utter, devastating peace. The photographs are accompanied by an evocative introduction by Attum to Sinai's wildlife and landscape.
 
Sinai: The Desert & Bedouins of South Sinai's Central Regions
Click Here to view in augmented reality
This book contains 168 full color photos of the desert environments in South Sinai's central regions and the local Bedouin people. The text includes descriptions of the lifestyle of the Bedouin--including a step-by-step series of the Libba bread-making process--their marriage practices, and tribal roles. Includes: index, driving distances, and a map showing where each photo was taken. Photos and text are by Ruth Shilling.
 
Standing Again at Sinai: Judaism from a Feminist Perspective
Click Here to view in augmented reality
A feminist critique of Judaism as a patriarchal tradition and an exploration of the increasing involvement of women in naming and shaping Jewish tradition.
 
The Sisters of Sinai: How Two Lady Adventurers Discovered the Hidden Gospels
Click Here to view in augmented reality
Agnes and Margaret Smith were not your typical Victorian scholars or adventurers. Female, middle-aged, and without university degrees or formal language training, the twin sisters nevertheless made one of the most important scriptural discoveries of their time: the earliest known copy of the Gospels in ancient Syriac, the language that Jesus spoke. In an era when most Westerners—male or female—feared to tread in the Middle East, they slept in tents and endured temperamental camels, unscrupulous dragomen, and suspicious monks to become unsung heroines in the continuing effort to discover the Bible as originally written.
 
My Felt Story - Sinai, 23 Precut Felt Pieces, Shavuot
Click Here to view in augmented reality
3 Stories in 1! A beautifully designed, interactive, felt set to tell, learn and play the story of Sinai. This felt set will inspire your child's imagination and gives them the opportunity to participate in the story, bringing it to life! My Felt Story is a fantastic resource for educators and preschool teachers. The felt used in this product is 3mm thick, is very durable and can be used with or without a felt board. This set includes 23 high quality felt pieces, 3 story scripts and songs. Feltboard sold separately.
 
The Sinai and Palestine Campaign of World War I: The History and Legacy of the British Empire’s Victory Over the Ottoman Empire in the Middle East
Click Here to view in augmented reality
*Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the fighting *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading Most books and documentaries about the First World War focus on the carnage of the Western Front, where Germany faced off against France, the British Empire, and their allies in a grueling slugfest that wasted millions of lives. The shattered landscape of the trenches has become symbolic of the war as a whole, and it is this experience that everyone associates with World War I, but that front was not the only experience. There was the more mobile Eastern Front, as well as mountain warfare in the Alps and scattered fighting in Africa and the Far East. There was also the Middle Eastern Front, in both the Levant and Mesopotamia, which captured the imagination of the European public. There, the British and their allies fought the Ottoman Turkish Empire under harsh desert conditions hundreds of miles from home, struggling for possession of places most people only knew from the Bible and the Koran. The campaign to protect British Egypt from Turkish invasion was especially important to the Allied war effort. The Turks sought to cut the Suez Canal, a vital supply route connecting the Mediterranean with British colonies in East Africa and India and Britain’s allies in Australia and New Zealand. Kaiser Wilhelm of Germany quipped that the canal was the “jugular vein of the British Empire.” Egypt at the outbreak of war was still nominally part of the Ottoman Empire, though British troops had been there since 1882, and the British ruled in all but name, with an Egyptian khedive as the supposed head of state. When the Ottoman Empire entered the war in late October of 1914, the British were quick to make Egypt a protectorate. With the Ottomans declaring jihad, or “holy war,” against the Allies and calling for all Muslims to rise up, the British quickly removed Khedive Abbas Il Helmi, who was pro-German, and replaced him with the more tractable Hussein Kamel. It wasn’t long into the campaign before the men had to march in that heat, pushing the Turks out of the Sinai and continuing into Palestine. The Turks suffered greatly in their marches as they prepared to attack Egypt, and the British would soon learn to appreciate what their enemies had been through. Massey noted, “There was a time when six miles a day in marching order was considered the utmost limit for infantry in the eastern desert. One day, when travelling light, during the battle of Romani, I tramped twelve miles and could get nobody to believe me. At the end of it I chanced upon the East Lancashire troops at Canterbury Siding, and could not move for two hours. Yet I have been a walker and runner from my youth up. I was fresher after a London to Brighton walk [about 50 miles], untrained, than at the finish of that desert twelve miles. And I was not carrying a sixth of the weight of the foot-sloggers. The fatigue of marching with the sun overhead was no light trial.” For the men of the Allied and Ottoman armies, the land was as fearsome of an enemy as the men opposing them. The Sinai and Palestine Campaign of World War I: The History and Legacy of the British Empire’s Victory Over the Ottoman Empire in the Middle East examines the history of this crucial but often overlooked campaign. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the campaign like never before.
 
Sinai and Zion
Click Here to view in augmented reality
A treasury of religious thought and faith--places the symbolic world of the Bible in its original context.
 
Custom Search
Sinai
Sinai Central
Sinai Hospital
Sinai Peninsula Map
Sinai Grace
Sinai Temple
Sinai Health System
Sinai Bible
Sinai Scholars
Sinai Covenant

Search
Sinai
Sinai Central
Sinai Hospital
Sinai Peninsula Map
Sinai Grace
Sinai Temple
Sinai Health System
Sinai Bible
Sinai Scholars
Sinai Covenant

Deals
Sinai
 
vlrPhone
vlrFilter

Project of very low consumption, radiation and bitrate softphones, with the support of the spatial audio, of the frequency shifts and of the ultrasonic communications
Multifunction Audio Filter with Remote Control
More Information
Free the Animation VR
AR

Play to reveal 3D images and 3D models
More Information

WhmSoft Moblog
Copyright (C) 2006-2018 WhmSoft
All Rights Reserved