Todd Davis
Todd Davis

Get Better: 15 Proven Practices to Build Effective Relationships at Work
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Build Relationships That Will Become Your Organization's Greatest Assets Fans of Crucial Conversations, The Speed of Trust, Radical Candor, and The Five Dysfunctions of a Team will love Get Better, from the publisher that brought you The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People. Strengthen relationships and improve communications skills: In Get Better: 15 Proven Practices to Build Effective Relationships at Work, Chief People Officer Todd Davis moves beyond the adage that an organization's greatest assets are its people. Instead, relationships drive professional and personal effectiveness—and, in the end, create a culture that can become an organization's competitive advantage. Improve your emotional intelligence and become the ideal team player: In an approachable, engaging style, using real-world stories, Davis uncovers the most common relationship pitfalls that hurt careers and organizational results. From his experience observing, leading, and coaching others for more than thirty years, David identifies fifteen proven practices that anyone at any level of an organization can apply to be successful at work, improve business results, and truly master effective relationships. Readers will learn how to: -Behave their way to credibility -Think we, not me -Take stock of their emotional bank accounts -Examine their real motives -Do less talking and more active listening -Make it safe to tell the truth and have difficult conversations -Start with humility and much more! Master communication, understand your emotions, and build effective relationships.
 
Winterkill
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In Winterkill, Todd Davis, who, according to Gray’s Sporting Journal, “observes nature in the great tradition of Robert Frost, James Dickey, and Jim Harrison,” offers an unflinching portrait of the cycles of birth and death in the woods and streams of Pennsylvania, while never leaving behind the tragedies and joys of the human world. Fusing narrative and lyrical impulses, in his fifth book of poetry Davis seeks to address the living world through a lens of transformation. In poems of praise and sorrow that draw upon the classical Chinese rivers-and-mountains tradition, Davis chronicles the creatures of forest and sky, of streams and lakes, moving through cycles of fecundity and lack, paying witness to the fundamental processes of the earth that offer the possibility of regeneration, even resurrection. Meditations on subjects from native brook trout to the ants that scramble up a compost pile; from a young diabetic girl burning trash in a barrel to a neighbor’s denial of global warming; from an examination of the bone structure in a rabbit’s skull to a depiction of a boy who can name every bird by its far-off song, these are poems that both celebrate and lament the perfectly imperfect world that sustains us.
 
Native Species
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In his sixth book of poetry, Todd Davis, who Harvard Review declares is “unflinchingly candid and enduringly compassionate,” confesses that “it’s hard to hide my love for the pleasures of the earth.” In poems both achingly real and stunningly new, he ushers the reader into a consideration of the green world and our uncertain place in it. As he writes in “Dead Letter to James Wright,” “You said / you’d wasted your life. / I’m still not sure / what species I am.” To that end, Native Species explores what happens to us—to all of us, bear, deer, mink, trout, moose, girl, boy, woman, man—when we die, and what happens to the soul as it faces extinction—if it “migrates into the lives of other creatures, becomes a fox or frog, an ant in a colony serving a queen, a red salamander entering a pond before it freezes.” He wonders, too, “How many new beginnings are we granted?” It’s a beautiful question, and it freights, simultaneously, possibility and pain. These are the verses of a poet maturing into a new level of thinking, full of tenderness and love for the home that carries us all.
 
The Least of These
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In his third collection of poems Todd Davis advises us that "the only corruption comes / in not loving this life enough." Over the course of this masterful and heartfelt book it becomes clear that Davis not only loves the life he's been given, but also believes that the ravishing desire of this world can offer hope, and even joy, however it might be negotiated.      Drawing upon a range of stories from the Christian, Transcendental, and Asian traditions, as well as from his own deep understanding of the natural world, Davis explores the connection between the visible and invisible worlds, or what Pierre Teilhard de Chardin called "the incandescent surface of matter plunged in God."       A direct poetic descendant of Walt Whitman, Davis invites us to sing "the songs we collect in the hymnals of our flesh- / impromptu, a cappella, our mouths flung open / in a great wide O."
 
Some Heaven
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Todd Davis writes poems that are spare yet eloquent, poems with an appealing simplicity that belies their insight and consequence. They are rooted in the firmament of nature's frequently bruised bounty, yet grounded by our all-too-human experiences on this planet, living on a land that we so often treat with contempt or blunder through blindly. With the eye of a naturalist and the heart- wisdom of a sage, Davis reveals scenes of our lives that we might have otherwise missed. His poems are like the best kind of snapshot; they show us the details that deserve more attention, from a five- year-old's joy in sitting on Dad’s lap and "driving" the family car or standing on a chair to help Mom make Jell-O, to the devastation of drought on farmland or the extraordinary lushness of an ordinary backyard. Because Davis holds up these prose-photos and urges us to take another look, we suddenly experience their profundity and comprehend their meaning. With disarming directness, he connects nature to family, landscape to community, and earth to faith.      Some Heaven brings together more than 100 Davis poems. Most are concise; all are approachable. In fact, they pull readers in, stirring our senses, tickling our memories. Here are poems about Amish gardens, changing seasons, friends at school, tractors, and deer. Davis urges us to see?not to take a quick look, but to really see?frost on goldenrods, the qualities of dirt, the color of air. Underneath, of course, these are poems about universal themes: love, loss, life, death; but in Davis's skilled hands, they appear to us to be more akin to wild strawberries growing on a rock wall or apples discovered in an abandoned orchard: something fresh, unexpected, and thankfully welcomed.
 
In the Kingdom of the Ditch
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In poetry that is at once accessible and finely crafted, Todd Davis maps the mysterious arc between birth and death, celebrating the beauty and pain of our varied entrances and exits, while taking his readers into the deep forests and waterways of the northeastern United States. With an acute sensibility for language unlike any other working poet, Davis captures the smallest nuances in the flowers, trees, and animals he encounters through a daily life spent in the field. Davis draws upon stories and myths from Christian, Transcendental, and Buddhist traditions to explore the intricacies of the spiritual and physical world we too often overlook. In celebrating the abundant life he finds in a ditch—replete with Queen Anne’s lace and milkweed, raspberries and blackberries, goldenrod and daisies—Davis suggests that life is consistently transformed, resurrected by what grows out of the fecundity of our dying bodies. In his fourth collection the poet, praised by The Bloomsbury Review, Arts & Letters, and many others, provides not only a taxonomy of the flora and fauna of his native Pennsylvania but also a new way of speaking about the sacred walk we make with those we love toward the ultimate mystery of death.
 
Get Better Faster: A 90-Day Plan for Coaching New Teachers
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“Make sure your students follow your instructions.” That sounds like a straightforward instruction, but in fact, it’s fairly abstract. What does a teacher actually have to do to make sure students are following? Even the leader delivering this direction may not know, and the first-year teacher almost certainly doesn’t. The vast majority of teachers are only observed one or two times per year on average—and even among those who are observed, scarcely any are given feedback as to how they could improve. The bottom line is clear: teachers do not need to be evaluated so much as they need to be developed and coached.In Get Better Faster: A 90-Day Plan for Coaching New Teachers, Paul Bambrick-Santoyo shares instructive tools of how school leaders can effectively guide new teachers to success. Over the course of the book, we break down the most critical actions leaders and teachers must enact to achieve exemplary results. Designed for coaches as well as beginning teachers, Get Better Faster is an integral coaching tool for any school leader eager to help their teachers succeed.It’s the book’s focus on the actionable—the practice-able—that drives effective coaching. By practicing the concrete actions and micro-skills listed here, teachers will markedly improve their ability to lead a class, producing a steady chain reaction of future teaching success.Though focused heavily on the first 90 days of teacher development, it’s possible to implement this work at any time. New and old teachers alike can benefit from the guidance of Get Better Faster and close their existing instructional gaps.Packed with practical training tools, including agendas, presentation slides, a coach’s guide, handouts, planning templates, and 35 video clips of real teachers at work, Get Better Faster will teach you:The core principles of coaching: Go Granular, Make Feedback More Frequent, Top action steps to launch a teacher’s development in an easy-to-read scope and sequence guideThe four phases of skill building:Phase 1 (Pre-Teaching): Dress RehearsalPhase 2: Instant ImmersionPhase 3: Getting into GearPhase 4: The Power of Discourse
 
Handy Dad: 25 Awesome Projects for Dads and Kids
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Skate ramps, zip lines, go-carts, and more! In this super-fun book, Todd Davis—extreme sports athlete and host of HGTV's Over Your Head—presents 25 awesome projects for dads to build with their kids. Busy dads can choose projects that range from simple to challenging and take anywhere from five minutes to a full weekend. Readers are given all the directions they need to grab materials that can be found around the house or at the local hardware store and get to work banging up a sweet BMX ramp or half-pipe, building a tree house or tire swing, or throwing together a slip-and-slide or tie-dye station for an afternoon of fun. With plenty of color photographs, easy-to-follow instructions, and detailed illustrations, Handy Dad is chock-full of creative and inexpensive ways to keep kids (and dads) entertained for hours.
 
Learning to Improve: How America’s Schools Can Get Better at Getting Better
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As a field, education has largely failed to learn from experience. Time after time, promising education reforms fall short of their goals and are abandoned as other promising ideas take their place. In Learning to Improve, the authors argue for a new approach. Rather than “implementing fast and learning slow,” they believe educators should adopt a more rigorous approach to improvement that allows the field to “learn fast to implement well.” Using ideas borrowed from improvement science, the authors show how a process of disciplined inquiry can be combined with the use of networks to identify, adapt, and successfully scale up promising interventions in education. Organized around six core principles, the book shows how “networked improvement communities” can bring together researchers and practitioners to accelerate learning in key areas of education. Examples include efforts to address the high rates of failure among students in community college remedial math courses and strategies for improving feedback to novice teachers. Learning to Improve offers a new paradigm for research and development in education that promises to be a powerful driver of improvement for the nation’s schools and colleges.
 
Crowns of Thorns and Glory: Mary Todd Lincoln and Varina Howell Davis: The Two First Ladies of the Civil War
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Explores the parallels and distinctions between Mary Todd Lincoln and Varina Howell Davis during the Civil War years and their impact upon history
 
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