UN Human Rights Council
UN Human Rights Council
The UN Human Rights Council (Global Institutions)
Click Here to view in augmented reality
The UN Human Rights Council provides a detailed insight into this important organization. The UN was founded in the hope that lasting peace would be built on the foundations of human rights and economic and social progress. In 2006 the Commission on Human Rights was replaced by the Human Rights Council as the principal UN body concerned with human rights. It is even possible that the council might eventually become a principal organ of the world organization. The Human Rights Council is already the subject of major public interest and controversy. The Council has been criticized for having dropped some of the protection strategies of the former commission and this book aims to present a balanced view of the council, outlining its current role, acknowledging where it has made positive contributions, highlighting the deficiencies, and identifying options for improving the body’s future work. This book is destined to become the leading text on the Human Rights Council and will be essential reading for all those concerned with the future of international relations international organizations and human rights.
 
New Challenges for the UN Human Rights Machinery: What Future for the UN Treaty Body System and the Human Rights Council Procedures?
Click Here to view in augmented reality
With the growth of the UN's Treaty Body System, the harmonization and the coordination of working methods between the treaty bodies has become a pressing issue. Commentators spoke of a crisis of the system: a victim of its own success. In 2002, the UN Secretary-General considered that the development of the system had increased pressure on resources of both States and the secretariat, and had implication on the ability of the States to continue to meet their reporting obligations, while the secretariat struggled to continue to provide quality service to all treaty bodies. The UN invited States to reflect on a number of reform initiatives that could help to modernize the system. The possibility of replacing the reporting obligations owed to each of the treaty bodies, with a single report, was suggested. The UN also wished that strengthening and harmonization efforts could eventually lead to a single human rights Treaty Body, which could enhance human rights protection at national level. These suggestions were largely unacceptable to States parties, but the concept itself - of having States submitting single reports to a single human rights mechanism - was tried in the new Charter-based Universal Periodic Review mechanism of the new Human Rights Council, set up in 2007. While the new procedure had little impact on the challenges to the separate Treaty Body System which continued to grow, it certainly reinvigorated calls for a better coordination between the different elements of the UN Human Rights Machinery. In 2009, Navi Pillay, the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, gave new impetus to the discussions by addressing a renewed call on relevant stakeholders to initiate a process of reflection on ways of strengthening the Treaty Body System and, by extension, the UN Human Rights Protection System as a whole. This impressive collection of essays is a response to the High Commissioner's call, which joins initiatives by other stakeholders. The book has two parts, with one section reflecting on the Treaty Body System, and the second section on the Human Rights Council Procedures. M. Cherif Bassiouni, in April 2012, received the Wolfgang Friedmann Memorial Award which is given by the Columbia Journal of Transnational Law to a distinguished scholar or practitioner who has made outstanding contributions to the field of international law.
 
The United Nations Human Rights Council: A Critique and Early Assessment (Routledge Research in Human Rights Law)
Click Here to view in augmented reality
The United Nations Human Rights Council was created in 2006 to replace the UN Commission on Human Rights. The Council’s mandate and founding principles demonstrate that one of the main aims, at its creation, was for the Council to overcome the Commission’s flaws. Despite the need to avoid repeating its predecessor's failings, the Council’s form, nature and many of its roles and functions are strikingly similar to those of the Commission. This book examines the creation and formative years of the United Nations Human Rights Council and assesses the extent to which the Council has fulfilled its mandate. International law and theories of international relations are used to examine the Council and its functions. Council sessions, procedures and mechanisms are analysed in-depth, with particular consideration given to whether the Council has become politicised to the same extent as the Commission. Whilst remaining aware of the key differences in their functions, Rosa Freedman compares the work of the Council to that of treaty-based human rights bodies. The author draws on observations from her attendance at Council proceedings in order to offer a unique account of how the body works in practice. The United Nations Human Rights Council will be of great interest to students and scholars of human rights law and international relations, as well as lawyers, NGOs and relevant government agencies.
 
The Special Procedures of the Human Rights Council: A brief look from the inside and perspectives from outside
Click Here to view in augmented reality
'Special Procedures' is the collective name given to the different mandates of Independent Experts, Special Rapporteurs, and Working Groups in the field of human rights, appointed by the United Nations' Human Rights Council (and formerly by the now-defunct Commission on Human Rights), with the purpose of developing international human rights standards, receiving communications, visiting States, and generally advancing international human rights law and practice. They have been considered the "crown jewel" of the UN, for they symbolize a beacon of hope for victims of human rights abuses worldwide. This volume contributes to the dissemination of the work undertaken by different mandate-holders for the protection of human rights. The former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights and six acting UN human rights experts from different mandates (some of whom have now moved to other positions within the UN human rights machinery) shed light on different aspects of their work. By sharing their own reflections, experiences, and expectations, they provide an insider's view of the work undertaken by their mandates to promote the respect, protection, and fulfilment of human rights in all corners of the globe. Additionally, the book includes contributions from leading human rights law practitioners at the local level, who share their thoughts on the interaction and influence of international human rights law in the domestic sphere. [Subject: International Law, Human Rights Law]
 
Advancing Human Rights in Social Work Education
Click Here to view in augmented reality
This volume brings together a host of scholars to address curriculum development and teaching methodologies for integrating human rights into social work education. Contributors discuss the theoretical framework and practical applications of the human rights approach in the areas of diverse human rights orientations to curriculum development; policy, research, and social justice; travel study and exchange models; and special populations. The authors press readers to address not only the human rights violations reported widely in the media, but also more familiar issues such as child welfare, poverty, food insecurity, racism, and violence against women. In addition, readers will find ideas for course design and teaching strategies and ample reference material, such as specialized treaties of specific relevance to social work, country and shadow reports, and complaint mechanisms. This book illustrates how the powerful idea of human rights can inform and transform social work education, and ultimately, professional practice.
 
Human Rights in the Council of Europe and the European Union: Achievements, Trends and Challenges (Cambridge Studies in European Law and Policy)
Click Here to view in augmented reality
Confusion about the differences between the Council of Europe (the parent body of the European Court of Human Rights) and the European Union is commonplace amongst the general public. It even affects some lawyers, jurists, social scientists and students. This book will enable the reader to distinguish clearly between those human rights norms which originate in the Council of Europe and those which derive from the EU, vital for anyone interested in human rights in Europe and in the UK as it prepares to leave the EU. The main achievements of relevant institutions include securing minimum standards across the continent as they deal with increasing expansion, complexity, multidimensionality, and interpenetration of their human rights activities. The authors also identify the central challenges, particularly for the UK in the post-Brexit era where the components of each system need to be carefully distinguished and disentangled.
 
Conservative Christian Beliefs and Sexual Orientation in Social Work : Privilege, Oppression, and the Pursuit of Human Rights
Click Here to view in augmented reality
This important new work addresses the tensions and divisions in social work between conservative Christian religious beliefs and lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB)students, practitioners, faculty members, and clients. Authors representing a diverse range of sexual orientation and religious and professional identities explore the debate regarding freedom of religious expression and full sexual orientation affirmation. Their discussions provide a deeper understanding of the complexity of topics such as social identity, oppression, power and privilege, human rights and social justice, attitudes and prejudice, and ethics and the law. The book also discusses multiple ways of resolving some of the conflicts, including intergroup dialogue and sociodrama.
 
The United Nations Security Council in the Age of Human Rights
Click Here to view in augmented reality
The United Nations Security Council in the Age of Human Rights is the first comprehensive look at the human-rights dimensions of the work of the only body within the United Nations system capable of compelling action by its member states. Known popularly for its failure to prevent mass atrocities in Rwanda, the former Yugoslavia, and Syria, the breadth and depth of the Security Council's work on human rights in recent decades is much broader. This book examines questions such as: How is the Security Council dealing with human rights concerns? What does it see as the place of human rights in conflict prevention, peacemaking, and peacekeeping? And how does it address the quest for justice in the face of gross violations of human rights? Written by leading practitioners, scholars, and experts, this book provides a broad perspective that describes, explains, and evaluates the contribution of the Security Council to the promotion of human rights and how it might achieve the goals it has articulated more effectively.
 
The Legal Protection of Women From Violence: Normative Gaps in International Law (Human Rights and International Law)
Click Here to view in augmented reality
Violence against women remains one of the most pervasive human rights violations in the world today, and it permeates every society, at every level. Such violence is considered a systemic, widespread and pervasive human rights violation, experienced largely by women because they are women. Yet at the international level, there is a gap in the legal protection of women from violence. There is currently no binding international convention that explicitly prohibits such violence; or calls for its elimination; or, mandates the criminalisation of all forms of violence against women. This book critically analyses the treatment of violence against women in the United Nations system, and in three regional human rights systems. Each chapter explores the advantages and disadvantages coming from the legal instruments, the work of the monitoring systems, and the resulting findings and jurisprudence. The book proposes that the gap needs to be addressed through a new United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Violence against Women, or alternatively an Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination against Women. A new Convention or Optional Protocol would be part of the transformative agenda that is needed to normatively address the promotion of a life free of violence for women, the responsibility of states to act with due diligence in the elimination of all forms of violence against all women, and the systemic challenges that are the causes and consequences of such violence.
 
A People's History of the European Court of Human Rights
Click Here to view in augmented reality
The exceptionality of America’s Supreme Court has long been conventional wisdom. But the United States Supreme Court is no longer the only one changing the landscape of public rights and values. Over the past thirty years, the European Court of Human Rights has developed an ambitious, American-style body of law. Unheralded by the mass press, this obscure tribunal in Strasbourg, France has become, in many ways, the Supreme Court of Europe.Michael Goldhaber introduces American audiences to the judicial arm of the Council of Europe—a group distinct from the European Union, and much larger—whose mission is centered on interpreting the European Convention on Human Rights. The Council routinely confronts nations over their most culturally-sensitive, hot-button issues. It has stared down France on the issue of Muslim immigration; Ireland on abortion; Greece on Greek Orthodoxy; Turkey on Kurdish separatism; Austria on Nazism; and Britain on gay rights and corporal punishment. And what is most extraordinary is that nations commonly comply.In the battle for the world’s conscience, Goldhaber shows how the court in Strasbourg may be pulling ahead.
 
Custom Search
Un Human Rights Council

Search
Un Human Rights Council

Deals
UN Human Rights Council
 
vlrPhone
vlrFilter

Project of very low consumption, radiation and bitrate softphones, with the support of the spatial audio, of the frequency shifts and of the ultrasonic communications
Multifunction Audio Filter with Remote Control
More Information
Free the Animation VR
AR

Play to reveal 3D images and 3D models
More Information

WhmSoft Moblog
Copyright (C) 2006-2018 WhmSoft
All Rights Reserved