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Denzel Washington
Denzel Hayes Washington Jr. (born December 28, 1954) is an American actor, director, and producer. He has received three Golden Globe awards, a Tony Award

View Wikipedia Article

Denzel WashingtonWashington at press conference of The Hurricane, 2000 Berlinale.BornDenzel Hayes Washington Jr.
(1954-12-28) December 28, 1954 (age 63)
Mount Vernon, New York, U.S.NationalityAmericanAlma materFordham UniversityOccupation
  • Actor
  • director
  • producer
Years active1975–presentSpouse(s)Pauletta Pearson (m. 1983)Children4, including John David Washington

Denzel Hayes Washington Jr. (born December 28, 1954)[1] is an American actor, director, and producer. He has received three Golden Globe awards, a Tony Award,[2] and two Academy Awards: Best Supporting Actor for the historical war drama film Glory (1989) and Best Actor for his role as a corrupt cop in the crime thriller Training Day (2001).[3]

Washington has received much critical acclaim for his film work since the 1980s, including his portrayals of real-life figures such as South African anti-apartheid activist Steve Biko in Cry Freedom (1987), Muslim minister and human rights activist Malcolm X in Malcolm X (1992), boxer Rubin "Hurricane" Carter in The Hurricane (1999), football coach Herman Boone in Remember the Titans (2000), poet and educator Melvin B. Tolson in The Great Debaters (2007), and drug kingpin Frank Lucas in American Gangster (2007). He has been a featured actor in the films produced by Jerry Bruckheimer and has been a frequent collaborator of directors Spike Lee, Antoine Fuqua and Tony Scott. In 2016, Washington was selected as the recipient for the Cecil B. DeMille Lifetime Achievement Award at the 73rd Golden Globe Awards.

In 2002, Washington made his directorial debut with the biographical film Antwone Fisher.[4] His second directorial effort was The Great Debaters, released in 2007. Washington's third directorial effort, Fences, in which he also starred, was released on December 16, 2016, and was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture.[5]

Contents
  • 1 Early life and education
  • 2 Career
    • 2.1 Early work
    • 2.2 1990s
    • 2.3 2000s
    • 2.4 Return to theater
    • 2.5 2010s
  • 3 Personal life
  • 4 Filmography
  • 5 Awards and nominations
  • 6 References
  • 7 External links
Early life and education

Washington was born in Mount Vernon, New York. His mother, Lennis "Lynne" (née Lowe; born 1924),[6] was a beauty parlor owner and operator born in Georgia and partly raised in Harlem.[1][7][8][9] His father, Denzel Hayes Washington Sr. (1909–1991),[10] a native of Buckingham County, Virginia, was an ordained Pentecostal minister, and also worked for the New York City Water Department and at a local department store, S. Klein.

Washington attended Pennington-Grimes Elementary School in Mount Vernon until 1968. When he was 14, his parents divorced, and his mother sent him to a private preparatory school, Oakland Military Academy in New Windsor, New York. "That decision changed my life," Washington later said, "because I wouldn't have survived in the direction I was going. The guys I was hanging out with at the time, my running buddies, have now done maybe 40 years combined in the penitentiary. They were nice guys, but the streets got them."[11] After Oakland, Washington next attended Mainland High School, a public high school in Daytona Beach, Florida, from 1970 to 1971.[7] He was interested in attending Texas Tech University: "I grew up in the Boys Club in Mount Vernon, and we were the Red Raiders. So when I was in high school, I wanted to go to Texas Tech in Lubbock just because they were called the Red Raiders and their uniforms looked like ours."[12] Washington earned a B.A. in Drama and Journalism from Fordham University in 1977.[13] At Fordham, he played collegiate basketball as a guard[14] under coach P.J. Carlesimo.[15] After a period of indecision on which major to study and taking a semester off, Washington worked as creative arts director at an overnight summer camp, Camp Sloane YMCA in Lakeville, Connecticut. He participated in a staff talent show for the campers and a colleague suggested he try acting.[16]

Returning to Fordham that fall with a renewed purpose, Washington enrolled at the Lincoln Center campus to study acting, and where he was given the title roles in Eugene O'Neill's The Emperor Jones and Shakespeare's Othello. He then attended graduate school at the American Conservatory Theater in San Francisco, where he stayed for one year before returning to New York to begin a professional acting career.[17]

Career Early work

Washington spent the summer of 1976 in St. Mary's City, Maryland, in summer stock theater performing Wings of the Morning,[18][19] the Maryland State play, which was written for him by incorporating an African-American character/narrator based loosely on the historical figure from early colonial Maryland, Mathias Da Sousa.[18] Shortly after graduating from Fordham, Washington made his screen acting debut in the 1977 made-for-television film Wilma, and his first Hollywood appearance in the 1981 film Carbon Copy. He shared a 1982 Distinguished Ensemble Performance Obie Award for playing Private First Class Melvin Peterson in the Off-Broadway Negro Ensemble Company production A Soldier's Play which premiered November 20, 1981.[20]

Washington at the 62nd Academy Awards, at which he won Best Supporting Actor for the film Glory

A major career break came when Washington starred as Dr. Phillip Chandler in NBC's television hospital drama St. Elsewhere, which ran from 1982 to 1988. He was one of only a few African-American actors to appear on the series for its entire six-year run. He also appeared in several television, motion picture and stage roles, such as the films A Soldier's Story (1984), Hard Lessons (1986) and Power (1986). In 1987, he starred as South African anti-apartheid political activist Steven Biko in Richard Attenborough's Cry Freedom, for which he received a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor.

In 1989, Washington won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his portrayal of a defiant, self-possessed ex-slave soldier in the film Glory. That same year, he appeared in the film The Mighty Quinn; and in For Queen and Country, where he played the conflicted and disillusioned Reuben James, a British soldier who, despite a distinguished military career, returns to a civilian life where racism and inner city life lead to vigilantism and violence.

1990s

In 1990, Washington starred as Bleek Gilliam in the Spike Lee film Mo' Better Blues. In 1991, he starred as Demetrius Williams in the romantic drama Mississippi Masala. Washington was reunited with Lee to play one of his most critically acclaimed roles, the title character of 1992's Malcolm X. His performance as the black nationalist leader earned him another nomination for the Academy Award for Best Actor. The next year, he played the lawyer of a gay man with AIDS in the 1993 film Philadelphia. During the early and mid-1990s, Washington starred in several successful thrillers, including The Pelican Brief and Crimson Tide, as well as in the movie of the Shakespearean comedy Much Ado About Nothing. In 1996, he played a U.S. Army officer who, despondent about a deadly mistake he made, investigates a female chopper commander's worthiness for the Medal of Honor in Courage Under Fire with Meg Ryan. In 1996, he appeared with Whitney Houston in the romantic comedy The Preacher's Wife.[21]

In 1998, Washington starred in Spike Lee's film He Got Game. Washington played a father serving a six-year prison term when the prison warden offers him a temporary parole to convince his top-ranked high-school basketball player son (Ray Allen) to sign with the governor's alma mater, Big State. The film was Washington's third collaboration with Lee.[22]

In 1999, Washington starred in The Hurricane, a film about boxer Rubin 'Hurricane' Carter, whose conviction for triple murder was overturned after he spent almost 20 years in prison. Washington did receive a Golden Globe Award in 2000 and a Silver Bear Award at the Berlin International Film Festival for the role.

Washington in 2000 2000s

In 2000, Washington appeared in the Disney film Remember the Titans which grossed over $100 million in the U.S.[23] At the 57th Golden Globe Awards, Washington won the Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Drama for his work in The Hurricane. He was the first black actor to win the award since Sidney Poitier in 1963.[24][25]

Washington won an Academy Award for Best Actor for the 2001 cop thriller Training Day, where he played Detective Alonzo Harris, a corrupt Los Angeles cop. He was the second African-American actor to win the category after Sidney Poitier, who was presented with an Honorary Academy Award the same night.[26]

After appearing in 2002's box office success, the healthcare-themed John Q., Washington directed his first film, a well-reviewed drama called Antwone Fisher, in which he also co-starred.

Washington after a performance of Julius Caesar in May 2005

Between 2003 and 2004, Washington appeared in a series of thrillers that performed generally well at the box office, including Out of Time, Man on Fire, and The Manchurian Candidate.[27] In 2006, he starred in Inside Man, a Spike Lee-directed bank heist thriller co-starring Jodie Foster and Clive Owen, released in March, and Déjà Vu.

In 2007, Washington co-starred with Russell Crowe, for the second time after 1995's Virtuosity, in Ridley Scott's American Gangster. He also directed and starred in the drama The Great Debaters with Forest Whitaker. He next appeared in Tony Scott's 2009 film The Taking of Pelham 123 (a remake of the 1974 thriller of the same name), where he played New York City subway security chief Walter Garber opposite John Travolta's villain.[28]

Return to theater

In the summer of 1990, Washington appeared in the title role of the Public Theater's production of Shakespeare's Richard III. In 2005, he appeared onstage again as Marcus Brutus in a Broadway production of Julius Caesar. Despite mixed reviews, the production's limited run was a consistent sell-out.[29] In the spring of 2010, Washington played Troy Maxson, opposite Viola Davis, in the Broadway revival of August Wilson's Fences, for which he won a Tony Award for Best Actor in a Play on June 13, 2010.[30][31]

Washington's signature in front of Grauman's Chinese Theatre

From April to June 2014, Washington played the leading role in the Broadway production of Lorraine Hansberry's classic drama A Raisin in the Sun, directed by Kenny Leon.[32] The show received positive reviews and won the 2014 Tony Award for Best Revival of a Play.[33]

Beginning March 22, 2018, Washington starred as Theodore "Hickey" Hickman in a Broadway revival of Eugene O'Neill's The Iceman Cometh. The production, directed by George C. Wolfe, began regular performances April 26 and ran for 14 weeks.[34]

2010s Washington with Anne Hathaway at The Nobel Peace Prize Concert in 2010

In 2010, Washington starred in The Book of Eli, a post-Apocalyptic drama set in the near future. Also in 2010, he starred as a veteran railroad engineer in the action film Unstoppable, about an unmanned, half-mile-long runaway freight train carrying dangerous cargo. The film was his fifth and final collaboration with director Tony Scott, following Crimson Tide (1995), Man on Fire (2004), Déjà Vu (2006) and The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3 (2009).

In 2012, Washington starred in Flight, for which he was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actor. He co-starred with Ryan Reynolds in Safe House, where he prepared for his role by subjecting himself to a torture session that included waterboarding.[35] In 2013, Washington starred in 2 Guns, alongside Mark Wahlberg. In 2014, he starred in The Equalizer, an action thriller film directed by Antoine Fuqua and written by Richard Wenk, based on the television series of same name starring Edward Woodward.[36] He reprised his role in his first sequel, The Equalizer 2 (2018).

In 2016, Washington starred in the remake of 1960 western film of the same name, The Magnificent Seven, alongside Chris Pratt, Ethan Hawke, Vincent D'Onofrio, Lee Byung-hun, Manuel Garcia-Rulfo, Martin Sensmeier, Haley Bennett, and Peter Sarsgaard. Principal photography began on May 18, 2015, in north Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The film premiered on September 8 at the 2016 Toronto International Film Festival, and was released in the United States in conventional and IMAX theatres on September 23, 2016.[37]

Washington at the premiere of The Equalizer in 2014

In The Magnificent Seven, Washington plays Sam Chisolm ("the Bounty Hunter"), a duly sworn warrant officer from Wichita, Kansas.[38] His character was renamed from Chris Adams (played by Yul Brynner in the original film) to Sam Chisolm.[39] It is Washington's first Western film.[40] Washington did not watch Westerns growing up, as it was the end of the Western era in the movies. Moreover, he and his siblings were barred from going to the cinema by his father, a minister in a church. They grew up watching biblical films instead, like King of Kings and The Ten Commandments, although he has said that he watched portions of the shows Rawhide and Bonanza.[40][41] He did not view the original film in preparation, but has watched Seven Samurai.[40] Fuqua said that Washington, whom he had twice collaborated with, was his first choice to be cast irrespective of the role.[citation needed] The producers were skeptical whether he would take the job since it was a Western film, but Fuqua flew to New York City to negotiate with Washington, who accepted the offer.[42][43]

In 2016, Washington directed the film Fences, co-starring Viola Davis and based on Wilson's play of the same name, with a script by Wilson. Set in 1950s Pittsburgh, Washington plays a former Negro league baseball player working as a waste collector who struggles to provide for his family and come to terms with the events of his life. The film was released on December 16, 2016, by Paramount Pictures. For his performance, Washington was nominated in the Best Actor category for a Golden Globe Award and an Academy Award. In 2017, Washington starred in the legal drama film Roman J. Israel, Esq.. His performance was praised by critics and led to nominations for a Golden Globe Award, a Screen Actors Guild Award and an Academy Award, Washington's ninth Oscar nomination overall, and his sixth for Best Actor.

Personal life

On June 25, 1983, Washington married Pauletta Pearson, whom he met on the set of his first screen work, the television film Wilma. The couple have four children: John David (b. July 28, 1984), a former football player with the United Football League's Sacramento Mountain Lions (and before that, college football at Morehouse);[44] Katia (b. November 27, 1986) who graduated from Yale University with a Bachelor of Arts in 2010; and twins Olivia and Malcolm (b. April 10, 1991). Malcolm graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with a degree in film studies, and Olivia played a role in Lee Daniels's film The Butler. In 1995, Denzel and Pauletta renewed their wedding vows in South Africa with Archbishop Desmond Tutu officiating.[45]

Washington is a devout Christian,[46] and has considered becoming a preacher. He stated in 1999, "A part of me still says, 'Maybe, Denzel, you're supposed to preach. Maybe you're still compromising.' I've had an opportunity to play great men and, through their words, to preach. I take what talent I've been given seriously, and I want to use it for good."[47] In 1995, he donated US$2.5 million to help build the new West Angeles Church of God in Christ facility in Los Angeles.[48][49] Washington says he reads the Bible daily.[50]

Washington has served as the national spokesperson for Boys & Girls Clubs of America since 1993[51] and has appeared in public service announcements and awareness campaigns for the organization.[52] In addition, he has served as a board member for Boys & Girls Clubs of America since 1995.[53] Due to his philanthropic work with the Boys & Girls Club, PS 17X, a New York City Elementary School decided to officially name their school after Washington.

In mid-2004, Washington visited Brooke Army Medical Center (BAMC) at Fort Sam Houston, where he participated in a Purple Heart ceremony, presenting medals to three Army soldiers recovering from wounds they received while stationed in Iraq. He also visited the fort's Fisher House facilities, and after learning that it had exceeded its capacity, made a substantial donation to the Fisher House Foundation. Washington's other charitable contributions include US$1 million to Nelson Mandela's Children's Fund in 1995[54] and US$1 million to Wiley College to resuscitate the college's debate team.[55]

In 2012, Washington identified as an Independent voter. He supported Barack Obama in 2008.[56]

Washington has been a big fan of the Dallas Cowboys[57] and Los Angeles Lakers[58] since childhood.

The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia named Washington as one of three people (the others being directors Oliver Stone and Michael Moore) with whom they were willing to negotiate for the release of three defense contractors the group had held captive from 2003 to 2008.[59]

On May 18, 1991, Washington was awarded an honorary doctorate from his alma mater, Fordham University, for having "impressively succeeded in exploring the edge of his multifaceted talent".[60] In 2011, he donated $2 million to Fordham for an endowed chair of the theater department, as well as US$250,000 to establish a theater-specific scholarship at the school. He also received an honorary Doctorate of Humanities from Morehouse College on May 20, 2007.[61] and an honorary Doctor of Arts degree from the University of Pennsylvania on May 16, 2011.[62]

In 2008, Washington visited Israel with a delegation of African-American artists in honor of the state's 60th birthday.[63] In 2010, he visited Israel again to meet with his friend, head of the Messianic Jews' congregation in Haifa.[64]

In April 2014, Washington presented at Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS Easter Bonnet Competition with Bryan Cranston, Idina Menzel and Fran Drescher, after raising donations at his Broadway show A Raisin in the Sun.[65]

Filmography Main article: Denzel Washington on screen and stage Awards and nominations Main article: List of awards and nominations received by Denzel Washington References
  1. ^ a b "Denzel Washington Biography (1954–)". Filmreference.com. Retrieved 2011-08-14..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"\"""\"""'""'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  2. ^ "Five Ways Denzel Can Achieve His EGOT Dream". Newsfeed.time.com. June 14, 2010. Retrieved 2011-08-14.
  3. ^ (April 4, 2002). "Halle Berry, Denzel Washington get historic wins at Oscars. Jet. Digital version retrieved March 17, 2008. Archived January 27, 2010, at the Wayback Machine.
  4. ^ Bal, Sumeet (May 30, 2003). "Antwone Fisher". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved May 17, 2015.
  5. ^ D'Alessandro, Anthony (July 18, 2016). "Paramount Dates Denzel Washington's Feature Adaptation Of 'Fences'". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved July 18, 2016.
  6. ^ "Lennis (Lowe) Washington (1924)". WikiTree.
  7. ^ a b Nickson, Chris (1996). Denzel Washington. New York: St. Martin's Paperbacks. pp. 9–11. ISBN 0-312-96043-3.
  8. ^ Ingram, E. Renée (2005). Buckingham County. Arcadia Publishing. p. 55. ISBN 0-7385-1842-5.
  9. ^ "familyhistoryinsider.com".
  10. ^ "Denzel Hayes Washington Sr (1909 - 1991)". WikiTree.
  11. ^ Rader, Dodson (December 12, 1999). "I Try To Send A Good Message". Parade Magazine. Archived from the original on April 11, 2006. Retrieved March 12, 2014.
  12. ^ "Leach OK with star power". Florida Times-Union. Archived from the original on March 3, 2012. Retrieved December 31, 2007.
  13. ^ "Denzel Washington Returns to Acting Roots". Fordham.edu. October 28, 2003. Retrieved 2011-08-14.
  14. ^ Frank Isola, "Spurs Coach Sticks Neck Out for Carlesimo", New York Daily News, June 5, 2003.
  15. ^ Wise, Mike (March 22, 1998). "Pro Basketball" Notebook; Chicago's Jordan-Jackson-Pippen Triangle, page 2". New York Times. Retrieved 2011-08-14.
  16. ^ Paisner, Daniel A Hand to Guide Me (Meredith Books, 2006), p. 17. ISBN 978-0-696-23049-3
  17. ^ Denzel Washington Biography, AllMovie.com. accessdate=February 13, 2008
  18. ^ a b "Matthias da Sousa: Colonial Maryland's Black, Jewish Assemblyman", Susan Rosenfeld Falb, MARYLAND HISTORICAL MAGAZINE, VOL. 73, No. 4, DECEMBER 1978 http://msa.maryland.gov/megafile/msa/speccol/sc5800/sc5881/000001/000000/000293/pdf/msa_sc_5881_1_293.pdf
  19. ^ "St. Mary's: A When-Did Timeline" Archived February 21, 2014, at the Wayback Machine., p. 30, By Janet Butler Haugaard, Executive Editor and Writer, St. Mary's College of Maryland with Susan G. Wilkinson, Director of Marketing and Communications, Historic St. Mary's City Commission and Julia A. King, Associate Professor of Anthropology, St. Mary's College of Maryland. St. Mary's Archives.
  20. ^ A Soldier's Play Archived January 6, 2005, at the Wayback Machine., Lortel Archives
  21. ^ Goldstein, Patrick (11 December 1996). "Praying for Crossover Appeal". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 16 June 2015.
  22. ^ "Going Fourth Denzel Washington And Spike Lee On Their Quartet Of Movies". Thefreelibrary.com. Retrieved 2011-08-14.
  23. ^ "Remember the Titans (2000)". Box Office Mojo. January 28, 2001. Retrieved 2011-08-14.
  24. ^ From the archive (March 23, 2000). "All ready for a storm". Herald Scotland. Retrieved February 24, 2011.
  25. ^ "Denzel Washington and Halle Berry Win Golden Globe Awards". Jet. February 7, 2000. Retrieved February 24, 2011.
  26. ^ "Sidney Poitier". Oscars.org | Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. 2014-09-27. Retrieved 2018-02-04.
  27. ^ "Denzel Washington Movie Box Office Results". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved March 20, 2007.
  28. ^ "The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3". June 12, 2009 – via IMDb.
  29. ^ "A Big-Name Brutus in a Cauldron of Chaos", by Ben Brantley, The New York Times, April 4, 2005.
  30. ^ Farley, Christopher John (May 4, 2010). "2010 Tony Award Nominations: Denzel Washington, Scarlett Johansson Earn Nods". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved May 4, 2010.
  31. ^ "BWW TV: 2010 Tony Winners- Washington & Davis", by BroadwayWorld, BroadwayWorld.com, June 14, 2010.
  32. ^ "Denzel Washington Heads Back To Broadway In 'A Raisin In The Sun'". deadline.com. 1 August 2013. Retrieved 2 August 2013.
  33. ^ "Tony-Winning Revival of A Raisin in the Sun Plays Final Performance Tonight". playbill.com. 15 June 2014. Retrieved 15 October 2014.
  34. ^ Haigney, Sophie (2017-08-21). "Denzel Washington to Star in 'Iceman Cometh' on Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2017-08-22.
  35. ^ Denzel Washington waterboarded while filming. Content.usatoday.com (2012-02-09). Retrieved on 2013-07-13.
  36. ^ Schaefer, Sandy (October 25, 2012). "Denzel Washington's 'Equalizer' Secures Start Date; Lining Up Directors". Screen Rant.
  37. ^ Masters, Tim (September 9, 2016). "Toronto 2016: Magnificent Seven diversity 'not a statement', says director" – via www.bbc.com.
  38. ^ Jay Jayson (September 3, 2016). "The Magnificent Seven Chris Pratt And Denzel Washington Character Vignettes". Comicbook.com. Retrieved September 7, 2016.
  39. ^ Jordan Zakarin (September 8, 2016). "'The Magnificent Seven' Isn't a Remake. It's a Reclamation". Inverse. Retrieved September 9, 2016.
  40. ^ a b c Darren Franich (August 11, 2016). "The Magnificent Seven: Chris Pratt, Denzel Washington share favorite Westerns". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved September 7, 2016.
  41. ^ Ariston Anderson (September 10, 2016). "Venice: Denzel Washington, Director Antoine Fuqua Talk Getting Into Character, Politics in 'Magnificent Seven'". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved September 10, 2016.
  42. ^ Rebecca Ford (September 8, 2016). "Toronto: How Antoine Fuqua Persuaded Denzel Washington to Join 'Magnificent Seven' (Q&A)". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved September 8, 2016.
  43. ^ Sharon Waxman (September 8, 2016). "Why 'Magnificent Seven' May Be Hollywood's First Color-Blind Blockbuster". TheWrap. Retrieved September 9, 2016.
  44. ^ Associated Press, ed. (May 1, 2006). "Denzel Washington's son among Rams signees". ESPN. Retrieved March 20, 2007.
  45. ^ "Denzel Washington and Wife Celebrate 27th Wedding Anniversary in Italy", LoveTripper.com, June 28, 2009
  46. ^ Ojumu, Akin (March 24, 2002). "The Observer Profile: Denzel Washington". The Observer. London. Retrieved February 11, 2008.
  47. ^ "Denzel Washington: 'I Try to Send A Good Message'". Parade Magazine. December 12, 1999. Archived from the original on April 11, 2006.
  48. ^ "Magic gives $5 mil., Denzel gives $2.5 mil. to build new West Angeles COGIC facility in Los Angeles". Jet. November 6, 1995 (link to headline only)
  49. ^ Mikkelson, Barbara and David (December 27, 2012). "Denzel Washington". Snopes.com. December 28, 2012.
  50. ^ "The GQ&A: Denzel Washington".
  51. ^ "Board". Bgca.org. Archived from the original on November 26, 2011. Retrieved August 14, 2011.
  52. ^ "BE GREAT Alumni". Bgca.org. Archived from the original on July 23, 2011. Retrieved 2011-08-14.
  53. ^ "Denzel Washington". Retrieved 16 June 2015.
  54. ^ "Denzel Washington". People.com. 2016. Retrieved May 15, 2016.
  55. ^ Ragland, James (2012-01-26). "Wiley College vs. USC: A debate rematch 77 years in the making". The Dallas Morning News. Retrieved 2013-08-20.
  56. ^ "Denzel Washington: Clint Eastwood Still 'My Hero'". Huffington Post. September 21, 2012. Archived from the original on September 24, 2012.
  57. ^ Jimmy Kimmel Live (September 21, 2016). "Denzel Washington Gives Pep Talks to the Dallas Cowboys" – via YouTube.
  58. ^ "NBA.com - Top 10 Celebrity Lakers Fans".
  59. ^ "Colombian rebels ask Denzel Washington to help broker hostage exchange". CBC Arts. November 10, 2006. Archived from the original on March 28, 2014. Retrieved March 28, 2014.
  60. ^ "COMMENCEMENTS: Fordham Graduates Urged to Defend the Poor". New York Times. May 19, 1991.
  61. ^ "Morehouse Celebrates an 'End of an Era' with a Special Commencement Message from Dr. Walter E. Massey", Morehouse College press release, May 15, 2007,
  62. ^ "Award-Winning Actor Denzel Washington Delivers Penn's 255th Commencement Address".
  63. ^ Eichner, Itamar (2008-02-06). "Denzel Washington to visit Israel". ynetNews.com. Retrieved January 27, 2010.
  64. ^ "Denzel Washington visits Israel". December 19, 2010.
  65. ^ "PHOTOS: James Franco, Idina Menzel, and Fran Drescher Get Into the Easter Bonnet Competition". Queerty. 2014.
External links Wikimedia Commons has media related to Denzel Washington.
  • Denzel Washington at Encyclopædia Britannica
  • Denzel Washington at AllMovie
  • Denzel Washington on IMDb
  • Denzel Washington at the TCM Movie Database
  • Denzel Washington at the Internet Broadway Database
  • Denzel Washington at Box Office Mojo
  • Denzel Washington at the Internet Off-Broadway Database
  • Denzel Washington at People.com
  • Denzel Washington at Moviefone
  • Denzel Washington at TVGuide.com
  • Denzel Washington at FutureMovies.co.uk
  • v
  • t
  • e
Films by Denzel WashingtonDirector
  • Antwone Fisher (2002)
  • The Great Debaters (2007)
  • Fences (2016)
Producer
  • Antwone Fisher (2002)
  • The Book of Eli (2010)
  • The Equalizer (2014)
  • Fences (2016)
  • The Equalizer 2 (2018)
Awards for Denzel Washington
  • v
  • t
  • e
Academy Award for Best Actor1928–1950
  • Emil Jannings (1928)
  • Warner Baxter (1929)
  • George Arliss (1930)
  • Lionel Barrymore (1931)
  • Fredric March / Wallace Beery (1932)
  • Charles Laughton (1933)
  • Clark Gable (1934)
  • Victor McLaglen (1935)
  • Paul Muni (1936)
  • Spencer Tracy (1937)
  • Spencer Tracy (1938)
  • Robert Donat (1939)
  • James Stewart (1940)
  • Gary Cooper (1941)
  • James Cagney (1942)
  • Paul Lukas (1943)
  • Bing Crosby (1944)
  • Ray Milland (1945)
  • Fredric March (1946)
  • Ronald Colman (1947)
  • Laurence Olivier (1948)
  • Broderick Crawford (1949)
  • José Ferrer (1950)
1951–1975
  • Humphrey Bogart (1951)
  • Gary Cooper (1952)
  • William Holden (1953)
  • Marlon Brando (1954)
  • Ernest Borgnine (1955)
  • Yul Brynner (1956)
  • Alec Guinness (1957)
  • David Niven (1958)
  • Charlton Heston (1959)
  • Burt Lancaster (1960)
  • Maximilian Schell (1961)
  • Gregory Peck (1962)
  • Sidney Poitier (1963)
  • Rex Harrison (1964)
  • Lee Marvin (1965)
  • Paul Scofield (1966)
  • Rod Steiger (1967)
  • Cliff Robertson (1968)
  • John Wayne (1969)
  • George C. Scott1 (1970)
  • Gene Hackman (1971)
  • Marlon Brando1 (1972)
  • Jack Lemmon (1973)
  • Art Carney (1974)
  • Jack Nicholson (1975)
1976–2000
  • Peter Finch (1976)
  • Richard Dreyfuss (1977)
  • Jon Voight (1978)
  • Dustin Hoffman (1979)
  • Robert De Niro (1980)
  • Henry Fonda (1981)
  • Ben Kingsley (1982)
  • Robert Duvall (1983)
  • F. Murray Abraham (1984)
  • William Hurt (1985)
  • Paul Newman (1986)
  • Michael Douglas (1987)
  • Dustin Hoffman (1988)
  • Daniel Day-Lewis (1989)
  • Jeremy Irons (1990)
  • Anthony Hopkins (1991)
  • Al Pacino (1992)
  • Tom Hanks (1993)
  • Tom Hanks (1994)
  • Nicolas Cage (1995)
  • Geoffrey Rush (1996)
  • Jack Nicholson (1997)
  • Roberto Benigni (1998)
  • Kevin Spacey (1999)
  • Russell Crowe (2000)
2001–present
  • Denzel Washington (2001)
  • Adrien Brody (2002)
  • Sean Penn (2003)
  • Jamie Foxx (2004)
  • Philip Seymour Hoffman (2005)
  • Forest Whitaker (2006)
  • Daniel Day-Lewis (2007)
  • Sean Penn (2008)
  • Jeff Bridges (2009)
  • Colin Firth (2010)
  • Jean Dujardin (2011)
  • Daniel Day-Lewis (2012)
  • Matthew McConaughey (2013)
  • Eddie Redmayne (2014)
  • Leonardo DiCaprio (2015)
  • Casey Affleck (2016)
  • Gary Oldman (2017)
1 refused award that year
  • v
  • t
  • e
Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor1936–1950
  • Walter Brennan (1936)
  • Joseph Schildkraut (1937)
  • Walter Brennan (1938)
  • Thomas Mitchell (1939)
  • Walter Brennan (1940)
  • Donald Crisp (1941)
  • Van Heflin (1942)
  • Charles Coburn (1943)
  • Barry Fitzgerald (1944)
  • James Dunn (1945)
  • Harold Russell (1946)
  • Edmund Gwenn (1947)
  • Walter Huston (1948)
  • Dean Jagger (1949)
  • George Sanders (1950)
1951–1975
  • Karl Malden (1951)
  • Anthony Quinn (1952)
  • Frank Sinatra (1953)
  • Edmond O'Brien (1954)
  • Jack Lemmon (1955)
  • Anthony Quinn (1956)
  • Red Buttons (1957)
  • Burl Ives (1958)
  • Hugh Griffith (1959)
  • Peter Ustinov (1960)
  • George Chakiris (1961)
  • Ed Begley (1962)
  • Melvyn Douglas (1963)
  • Peter Ustinov (1964)
  • Martin Balsam (1965)
  • Walter Matthau (1966)
  • George Kennedy (1967)
  • Jack Albertson (1968)
  • Gig Young (1969)
  • John Mills (1970)
  • Ben Johnson (1971)
  • Joel Grey (1972)
  • John Houseman (1973)
  • Robert De Niro (1974)
  • George Burns (1975)
1976–2000
  • Jason Robards (1976)
  • Jason Robards (1977)
  • Christopher Walken (1978)
  • Melvyn Douglas (1979)
  • Timothy Hutton (1980)
  • John Gielgud (1981)
  • Louis Gossett Jr. (1982)
  • Jack Nicholson (1983)
  • Haing S. Ngor (1984)
  • Don Ameche (1985)
  • Michael Caine (1986)
  • Sean Connery (1987)
  • Kevin Kline (1988)
  • Denzel Washington (1989)
  • Joe Pesci (1990)
  • Jack Palance (1991)
  • Gene Hackman (1992)
  • Tommy Lee Jones (1993)
  • Martin Landau (1994)
  • Kevin Spacey (1995)
  • Cuba Gooding Jr. (1996)
  • Robin Williams (1997)
  • James Coburn (1998)
  • Michael Caine (1999)
  • Benicio del Toro (2000)
2001–present
  • Jim Broadbent (2001)
  • Chris Cooper (2002)
  • Tim Robbins (2003)
  • Morgan Freeman (2004)
  • George Clooney (2005)
  • Alan Arkin (2006)
  • Javier Bardem (2007)
  • Heath Ledger (2008)
  • Christoph Waltz (2009)
  • Christian Bale (2010)
  • Christopher Plummer (2011)
  • Christoph Waltz (2012)
  • Jared Leto (2013)
  • J. K. Simmons (2014)
  • Mark Rylance (2015)
  • Mahershala Ali (2016)
  • Sam Rockwell (2017)
  • v
  • t
  • e
AFI Life Achievement Award
  • John Ford (1973)
  • James Cagney (1974)
  • Orson Welles (1975)
  • William Wyler (1976)
  • Bette Davis (1977)
  • Henry Fonda (1978)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (1979)
  • James Stewart (1980)
  • Fred Astaire (1981)
  • Frank Capra (1982)
  • John Huston (1983)
  • Lillian Gish (1984)
  • Gene Kelly (1985)
  • Billy Wilder (1986)
  • Barbara Stanwyck (1987)
  • Jack Lemmon (1988)
  • Gregory Peck (1989)
  • David Lean (1990)
  • Kirk Douglas (1991)
  • Sidney Poitier (1992)
  • Elizabeth Taylor (1993)
  • Jack Nicholson (1994)
  • Steven Spielberg (1995)
  • Clint Eastwood (1996)
  • Martin Scorsese (1997)
  • Robert Wise (1998)
  • Dustin Hoffman (1999)
  • Harrison Ford (2000)
  • Barbra Streisand (2001)
  • Tom Hanks (2002)
  • Robert De Niro (2003)
  • Meryl Streep (2004)
  • George Lucas (2005)
  • Sean Connery (2006)
  • Al Pacino (2007)
  • Warren Beatty (2008)
  • Michael Douglas (2009)
  • Mike Nichols (2010)
  • Morgan Freeman (2011)
  • Shirley MacLaine (2012)
  • Mel Brooks (2013)
  • Jane Fonda (2014)
  • Steve Martin (2015)
  • John Williams (2016)
  • Diane Keaton (2017)
  • George Clooney (2018)
  • Denzel Washington (2019)
  • Portal
  • v
  • t
  • e
Britannia AwardsExcellence in Film
  • Albert R. Broccoli (1989)
  • Michael Caine (1990)
  • Peter Ustinov (1992)
  • Martin Scorsese (1993)
  • Anthony Hopkins (1995)
  • Bob Weinstein and Harvey Weinstein (1996)
  • Dustin Hoffman (1997)
  • John Travolta (1998)
  • Stanley Kubrick (1999)
  • Steven Spielberg (2000)
  • George Lucas (2002)
  • Hugh Grant (2003)
  • Tom Hanks (2004)
  • Tom Cruise (2005)
  • Clint Eastwood (2006)
  • Denzel Washington (2007)
  • Sean Penn (2008)
  • Robert De Niro (2009)
  • Jeff Bridges (2010)
  • Warren Beatty (2011)
  • Daniel Day-Lewis (2012)
  • George Clooney (2013)
  • Robert Downey Jr. (2014)
  • Meryl Streep (2015)
  • Jodie Foster (2016)
  • Matt Damon (2017)
  • Cate Blanchett (2018)
Excellence in Directing
  • Peter Weir (2003)
  • Jim Sheridan (2004)
  • Mike Newell (2005)
  • Anthony Minghella (2006)
  • Martin Campbell (2007)
  • Stephen Frears (2008)
  • Danny Boyle (2009)
  • Christopher Nolan (2010)
  • David Yates (2011)
  • Quentin Tarantino (2012)
  • Kathryn Bigelow (2013)
  • Mike Leigh (2014)
  • Sam Mendes (2015)
  • Ang Lee (2016)
  • Ava DuVernay (2017)
  • Steve McQueen (2018)
Worldwide Contribution to
Entertainment
  • Howard Stringer (2003)
  • Kirk Douglas (2009)
  • Ridley Scott & Tony Scott (2010)
  • John Lasseter (2011)
  • Will Wright (2012)
  • Ben Kingsley (2013)
  • Judi Dench (2014)
  • Harrison Ford (2015)
  • Samuel L. Jackson (2016)
  • Kenneth Branagh (2017)
  • Kevin Feige (2018)
British Artist of the Year
  • Rachel Weisz (2006)
  • Kate Winslet (2007)
  • Tilda Swinton (2008)
  • Emily Blunt (2009)
  • Michael Sheen (2010)
  • Helena Bonham Carter (2011)
  • Daniel Craig (2012)
  • Benedict Cumberbatch (2013)
  • Emma Watson (2014)
  • James Corden (2015)
  • Felicity Jones (2016)
  • Claire Foy (2017)
  • Emilia Clarke (2018)
Excellence in Comedy
  • Betty White (2010)
  • Ben Stiller (2011)
  • Trey Parker and Matt Stone (2012)
  • Sacha Baron Cohen (2013)
  • Julia Louis-Dreyfus (2014)
  • Amy Schumer (2015)
  • Ricky Gervais (2016)
  • Aziz Ansari (2017)
  • Jim Carrey (2018)
Excellence in Television
  • Aaron Spelling (1999)
  • HBO Original Programming (2002)
  • Dick Van Dyke (2017)
  • Damian Lewis (2018)
Humanitarian Award
  • Richard Curtis (2007)
  • Don Cheadle (2008)
  • Colin Firth (2009)
  • Idris Elba (2013)
  • Mark Ruffalo (2014)
  • Orlando Bloom (2015)
  • Ewan McGregor (2016)
Retired Awards
  • BBC (1999)
  • Tarsem Singh (1999)
  • Angela Lansbury (2003)
  • Helen Mirren (2004)
  • Elizabeth Taylor (2005)
  • Ronald Neame (2005)
  • Sidney Poitier (2006)
  • Bob Shaye and Michael Lynne (2007)
  • v
  • t
  • e
Black Reel Award for Outstanding Director2000-2009
  • Malcolm D. Lee (2000)
  • Gina Prince-Bythewood (2001)
  • Antoine Fuqua (2002)
  • Denzel Washington (2003)
  • F. Gary Gray (2004)
  • Mario Van Peebles (2005)
  • Thomas Carter (2006)
  • Spike Lee (2007)
  • Gina Prince-Bythewood (2008)
  • no awards in 2009
2010-present
  • Lee Daniels (2010)
  • Albert Hughes and Allen Hughes (2011)
  • Steve McQueen (2012)
  • Ava DuVernay (2013)
  • Steve McQueen (2014)
  • Ava DuVernay (2015)
  • Ryan Coogler (2016)
  • Barry Jenkins (2017)
  • Jordan Peele (2018)
  • v
  • t
  • e
Silver Bear for Best Actor
  • Burt Lancaster (1956)
  • Pedro Infante (1957)
  • Sidney Poitier (1958)
  • Jean Gabin (1959)
  • Fredric March (1960)
  • Peter Finch (1961)
  • James Stewart (1962)
  • Sidney Poitier (1963)
  • Rod Steiger (1964)
  • Lee Marvin (1965)
  • Jean-Pierre Léaud (1966)
  • Michel Simon (1967)
  • Jean-Louis Trintignant (1968)
  • Jean Gabin (1971)
  • Alberto Sordi (1972)
  • Vlastimil Brodský (1975)
  • Gerhard Olschewski (1976)
  • Fernando Fernán Gómez (1977)
  • Craig Russell (1978)
  • Michele Placido (1979)
  • Andrzej Seweryn (1980)
  • Anatoly Solonitsyn / Jack Lemmon (1981)
  • Stellan Skarsgård / Michel Piccoli (1982)
  • Bruce Dern (1983)
  • Albert Finney (1984)
  • Fernando Fernán Gómez (1985)
  • Tuncel Kurtiz (1986)
  • Gian Maria Volontè (1987)
  • Jörg Pose / Manfred Möck (1988)
  • Gene Hackman (1989)
  • Iain Glen (1990)
  • Maynard Eziashi (1991)
  • Armin Mueller-Stahl (1992)
  • Denzel Washington (1993)
  • Tom Hanks (1994)
  • Paul Newman (1995)
  • Sean Penn (1996)
  • Leonardo DiCaprio (1997)
  • Samuel L. Jackson (1998)
  • Michael Gwisdek (1999)
  • Denzel Washington (2000)
  • Benicio del Toro (2001)
  • Jacques Gamblin (2002)
  • Sam Rockwell (2003)
  • Daniel Hendler (2004)
  • Lou Taylor Pucci (2005)
  • Moritz Bleibtreu (2006)
  • Julio Chávez (2007)
  • Reza Naji (2008)
  • Sotigui Kouyaté (2009)
  • Grigoriy Dobrygin / Sergei Puskepalis (2010)
  • Peyman Moaadi / Shahab Hosseini / Ali-Asghar Shahbazi / Babak Karimi (2011)
  • Mikkel Følsgaard (2012)
  • Nazif Mujić (2013)
  • Liao Fan (2014)
  • Tom Courtenay (2015)
  • Majd Mastoura (2016)
  • Georg Friedrich (2017)
  • v
  • t
  • e
Boston Society of Film Critics Award for Best Actor
  • Robert De Niro (1980)
  • Burt Lancaster (1981)
  • Dustin Hoffman (1982)
  • Eric Roberts (1983)
  • Haing S. Ngor (1984)
  • Jack Nicholson (1985)
  • Bob Hoskins (1986)
  • Albert Brooks (1987)
  • Daniel Day-Lewis (1988)
  • Daniel Day-Lewis (1989)
  • Jeremy Irons (1990)
  • Nick Nolte (1991)
  • Denzel Washington (1992)
  • Daniel Day-Lewis (1993)
  • Albert Finney (1994)
  • Nicolas Cage (1995)
  • Geoffrey Rush (1996)
  • Al Pacino (1997)
  • Brendan Gleeson (1998)
  • Jim Carrey (1999)
  • Colin Farrell (2000)
  • Brian Cox / Denzel Washington (2001)
  • Adrien Brody (2002)
  • Bill Murray (2003)
  • Jamie Foxx (2004)
  • Philip Seymour Hoffman (2005)
  • Forest Whitaker (2006)
  • Frank Langella (2007)
  • Sean Penn / Mickey Rourke (2008)
  • Jeremy Renner (2009)
  • Jesse Eisenberg (2010)
  • Brad Pitt (2011)
  • Daniel Day-Lewis (2012)
  • Chiwetel Ejiofor (2013)
  • Michael Keaton (2014)
  • Paul Dano / Leonardo DiCaprio (2015)
  • Casey Affleck (2016)
  • Daniel Kaluuya (2017)
  • v
  • t
  • e
Cecil B. DeMille Award
  • Cecil B. DeMille (1952)
  • Walt Disney (1953)
  • Darryl F. Zanuck (1954)
  • Jean Hersholt (1955)
  • Jack L. Warner (1956)
  • Mervyn LeRoy (1957)
  • Buddy Adler (1958)
  • Maurice Chevalier (1959)
  • Bing Crosby (1960)
  • Fred Astaire (1961)
  • Judy Garland (1962)
  • Bob Hope (1963)
  • Joseph E. Levine (1964)
  • James Stewart (1965)
  • John Wayne (1966)
  • Charlton Heston (1967)
  • Kirk Douglas (1968)
  • Gregory Peck (1969)
  • Joan Crawford (1970)
  • Frank Sinatra (1971)
  • Alfred Hitchcock (1972)
  • Samuel Goldwyn (1973)
  • Bette Davis (1974)
  • Hal B. Wallis (1975)
  • Walter Mirisch (1977)
  • Red Skelton (1978)
  • Lucille Ball (1979)
  • Henry Fonda (1980)
  • Gene Kelly (1981)
  • Sidney Poitier (1982)
  • Laurence Olivier (1983)
  • Paul Newman (1984)
  • Elizabeth Taylor (1985)
  • Barbara Stanwyck (1986)
  • Anthony Quinn (1987)
  • Clint Eastwood (1988)
  • Doris Day (1989)
  • Audrey Hepburn (1990)
  • Jack Lemmon (1991)
  • Robert Mitchum (1992)
  • Lauren Bacall (1993)
  • Robert Redford (1994)
  • Sophia Loren (1995)
  • Sean Connery (1996)
  • Dustin Hoffman (1997)
  • Shirley MacLaine (1998)
  • Jack Nicholson (1999)
  • Barbra Streisand (2000)
  • Al Pacino (2001)
  • Harrison Ford (2002)
  • Gene Hackman (2003)
  • Michael Douglas (2004)
  • Robin Williams (2005)
  • Anthony Hopkins (2006)
  • Warren Beatty (2007)
  • Steven Spielberg (2009)
  • Martin Scorsese (2010)
  • Robert De Niro (2011)
  • Morgan Freeman (2012)
  • Jodie Foster (2013)
  • Woody Allen (2014)
  • George Clooney (2015)
  • Denzel Washington (2016)
  • Meryl Streep (2017)
  • Oprah Winfrey (2018)
  • v
  • t
  • e
Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Drama
  • Paul Lukas (1943)
  • Alexander Knox (1944)
  • Ray Milland (1945)
  • Gregory Peck (1946)
  • Ronald Colman (1947)
  • Laurence Olivier (1948)
  • Broderick Crawford (1949)
  • José Ferrer (1950)
  • Fredric March (1951)
  • Gary Cooper (1952)
  • Spencer Tracy (1953)
  • Marlon Brando (1954)
  • Ernest Borgnine (1955)
  • Kirk Douglas (1956)
  • Alec Guinness (1957)
  • David Niven (1958)
  • Anthony Franciosa (1959)
  • Burt Lancaster (1960)
  • Maximilian Schell (1961)
  • Gregory Peck (1962)
  • Sidney Poitier (1963)
  • Peter O'Toole (1964)
  • Omar Sharif (1965)
  • Paul Scofield (1966)
  • Rod Steiger (1967)
  • Peter O'Toole (1968)
  • John Wayne (1969)
  • George C. Scott (1970)
  • Gene Hackman (1971)
  • Marlon Brando (1972)
  • Al Pacino (1973)
  • Jack Nicholson (1974)
  • Jack Nicholson (1975)
  • Peter Finch (1976)
  • Richard Burton (1977)
  • Jon Voight (1978)
  • Dustin Hoffman (1979)
  • Robert De Niro (1980)
  • Henry Fonda (1981)
  • Ben Kingsley (1982)
  • Robert Duvall / Tom Courtenay (1983)
  • F. Murray Abraham (1984)
  • Jon Voight (1985)
  • Bob Hoskins (1986)
  • Michael Douglas (1987)
  • Dustin Hoffman (1988)
  • Tom Cruise (1989)
  • Jeremy Irons (1990)
  • Nick Nolte (1991)
  • Al Pacino (1992)
  • Tom Hanks (1993)
  • Tom Hanks (1994)
  • Nicolas Cage (1995)
  • Geoffrey Rush (1996)
  • Peter Fonda (1997)
  • Jim Carrey (1998)
  • Denzel Washington (1999)
  • Tom Hanks (2000)
  • Russell Crowe (2001)
  • Jack Nicholson (2002)
  • Sean Penn (2003)
  • Leonardo DiCaprio (2004)
  • Philip Seymour Hoffman (2005)
  • Forest Whitaker (2006)
  • Daniel Day-Lewis (2007)
  • Mickey Rourke (2008)
  • Jeff Bridges (2009)
  • Colin Firth (2010)
  • George Clooney (2011)
  • Daniel Day-Lewis (2012)
  • Matthew McConaughey (2013)
  • Eddie Redmayne (2014)
  • Leonardo DiCaprio (2015)
  • Casey Affleck (2016)
  • Gary Oldman (2017)
  • v
  • t
  • e
Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture
  • Akim Tamiroff (1943)
  • Barry Fitzgerald (1944)
  • J. Carrol Naish (1945)
  • Clifton Webb (1946)
  • Edmund Gwenn (1947)
  • Walter Huston (1948)
  • James Whitmore (1949)
  • Edmund Gwenn (1950)
  • Peter Ustinov (1951)
  • Millard Mitchell (1952)
  • Frank Sinatra (1953)
  • Edmond O'Brien (1954)
  • Arthur Kennedy (1955)
  • Earl Holliman (1956)
  • Red Buttons (1957)
  • Burl Ives (1958)
  • Stephen Boyd (1959)
  • Sal Mineo (1960)
  • George Chakiris (1961)
  • Omar Sharif (1962)
  • John Huston (1963)
  • Edmond O'Brien (1964)
  • Oskar Werner (1965)
  • Richard Attenborough (1966)
  • Richard Attenborough (1967)
  • Daniel Massey (1968)
  • Gig Young (1969)
  • John Mills (1970)
  • Ben Johnson (1971)
  • Joel Grey (1972)
  • John Houseman (1973)
  • Fred Astaire (1974)
  • Richard Benjamin (1975)
  • Laurence Olivier (1976)
  • Peter Firth (1977)
  • John Hurt (1978)
  • Melvyn Douglas/Robert Duvall (1979)
  • Timothy Hutton (1980)
  • John Gielgud (1981)
  • Louis Gossett Jr. (1982)
  • Jack Nicholson (1983)
  • Haing S. Ngor (1984)
  • Klaus Maria Brandauer (1985)
  • Tom Berenger (1986)
  • Sean Connery (1987)
  • Martin Landau (1988)
  • Denzel Washington (1989)
  • Bruce Davison (1990)
  • Jack Palance (1991)
  • Gene Hackman (1992)
  • Tommy Lee Jones (1993)
  • Martin Landau (1994)
  • Brad Pitt (1995)
  • Edward Norton (1996)
  • Burt Reynolds (1997)
  • Ed Harris (1998)
  • Tom Cruise (1999)
  • Benicio del Toro (2000)
  • Jim Broadbent (2001)
  • Chris Cooper (2002)
  • Tim Robbins (2003)
  • Clive Owen (2004)
  • George Clooney (2005)
  • Eddie Murphy (2006)
  • Javier Bardem (2007)
  • Heath Ledger (2008)
  • Christoph Waltz (2009)
  • Christian Bale (2010)
  • Christopher Plummer (2011)
  • Christoph Waltz (2012)
  • Jared Leto (2013)
  • J. K. Simmons (2014)
  • Sylvester Stallone (2015)
  • Aaron Taylor-Johnson (2016)
  • Sam Rockwell (2017)
  • v
  • t
  • e
Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award for Best Actor
  • Al Pacino (1975)
  • Robert De Niro (1976)
  • Richard Dreyfuss (1977)
  • Jon Voight (1978)
  • Dustin Hoffman (1979)
  • Robert De Niro (1980)
  • Burt Lancaster (1981)
  • Ben Kingsley (1982)
  • Robert Duvall (1983)
  • F. Murray Abraham / Albert Finney (1984)
  • William Hurt (1985)
  • Bob Hoskins (1986)
  • Jack Nicholson / Steve Martin (1987)
  • Tom Hanks (1988)
  • Daniel Day-Lewis (1989)
  • Jeremy Irons (1990)
  • Nick Nolte (1991)
  • Clint Eastwood (1992)
  • Anthony Hopkins (1993)
  • John Travolta (1994)
  • Nicolas Cage (1995)
  • Geoffrey Rush (1996)
  • Robert Duvall (1997)
  • Ian McKellen (1998)
  • Russell Crowe (1999)
  • Michael Douglas (2000)
  • Denzel Washington (2001)
  • Daniel Day-Lewis / Jack Nicholson (2002)
  • Bill Murray (2003)
  • Liam Neeson (2004)
  • Philip Seymour Hoffman (2005)
  • Sacha Baron Cohen / Forest Whitaker (2006)
  • Daniel Day-Lewis (2007)
  • Sean Penn (2008)
  • Jeff Bridges (2009)
  • Colin Firth (2010)
  • Michael Fassbender (2011)
  • Joaquin Phoenix (2012)
  • Bruce Dern (2013)
  • Tom Hardy (2014)
  • Michael Fassbender (2015)
  • Adam Driver (2016)
  • Timothée Chalamet (2017)
  • v
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  • e
MTV Movie Award for Best Actor in a MovieBest Male
Performance
  • Arnold Schwarzenegger (1992)
  • Denzel Washington (1993)
  • Tom Hanks (1994)
  • Brad Pitt (1995)
  • Jim Carrey (1996)
  • Tom Cruise (1997)
  • Leonardo DiCaprio (1998)
  • Jim Carrey (1999)
  • Keanu Reeves (2000)
  • Tom Cruise (2001)
  • Will Smith (2002)
  • Eminem (2003)
  • Johnny Depp (2004)
  • Leonardo DiCaprio (2005)
  • Will Smith (2008)
  • Zac Efron (2009)
  • Robert Pattinson (2010)
  • Robert Pattinson (2011)
  • Josh Hutcherson (2012)
  • Bradley Cooper (2013)
  • Josh Hutcherson (2014)
  • Bradley Cooper (2015)
  • Leonardo DiCaprio (2016)
Best Female
Performance
  • Linda Hamilton (1992)
  • Sharon Stone (1993)
  • Janet Jackson (1994)
  • Sandra Bullock (1995)
  • Alicia Silverstone (1996)
  • Claire Danes (1997)
  • Neve Campbell (1998)
  • Cameron Diaz (1999)
  • Sarah Michelle Gellar (2000)
  • Julia Roberts (2001)
  • Nicole Kidman (2002)
  • Kirsten Dunst (2003)
  • Uma Thurman (2004)
  • Lindsay Lohan (2005)
  • Ellen Page (2008)
  • Kristen Stewart (2009)
  • Kristen Stewart (2010)
  • Kristen Stewart (2011)
  • Jennifer Lawrence (2012)
  • Jennifer Lawrence (2013)
  • Jennifer Lawrence (2014)
  • Shailene Woodley (2015)
  • Charlize Theron (2016)
Best Performance
  • Jake Gyllenhaal (2006)
  • Johnny Depp (2007)
  • Emma Watson (2017)
  • Chadwick Boseman (2018)
  • v
  • t
  • e
MTV Movie Award for Best Villain
  • Rebecca De Mornay (1992)
  • Jennifer Jason Leigh (1993)
  • Alicia Silverstone (1994)
  • Dennis Hopper (1995)
  • Kevin Spacey (1996)
  • Jim Carrey (1997)
  • Mike Myers (1998)
  • Matt Dillon / Stephen Dorff (1999)†
  • Mike Myers (2000)
  • Jim Carrey (2001)
  • Denzel Washington (2002)
  • Daveigh Chase (2003)
  • Lucy Liu (2004)
  • Ben Stiller (2005)
  • Hayden Christensen (2006)
  • Jack Nicholson (2007)
  • Johnny Depp (2008)
  • Heath Ledger (2009)
  • Tom Felton (2010)
  • Tom Felton (2011)
  • Jennifer Aniston (2012)‡
  • Tom Hiddleston (2013)
  • Mila Kunis (2014)
  • Meryl Streep (2015)
  • Adam Driver (2016)
  • Jeffrey Dean Morgan (2017)
  • Michael B. Jordan (2018)
† Tie; ‡ The Award was re-named Best On-Screen Dirtbag
  • v
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  • e
NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Actor in a Motion Picture
  • Raymond St. Jacques (1969)
  • Jim Brown (1970)
  • Donald Sutherland (1971)
  • Billy Dee Williams (1972)
  • Bernie Casey (1974)
  • James Earl Jones (1975)
  • Bill Cosby (1976)
  • Billy Dee Williams (1977)
  • Paul Winfield (1978)
  • Michael Jackson (1979)
  • LeVar Burton (1980)
  • Richard Pryor (1981)
  • Louis Gossett Jr. (1982)
  • Eddie Murphy (1983)
  • Prince (1984)
  • Adolph Caesar (1985)
  • Gregory Hines (1986)
  • Danny Glover (1987)
  • Denzel Washington (1988)
  • Morgan Freeman (1989)
  • Morgan Freeman (1990)
  • Wesley Snipes (1992)
  • Denzel Washington (1993)
  • Denzel Washington (1994)
  • Denzel Washington (1996)
  • Denzel Washington (1997)
  • Djimon Hounsou (1998)
  • Danny Glover (1999)
  • Denzel Washington (2000)
  • Denzel Washington (2001)
  • Denzel Washington (2002)
  • Denzel Washington (2003)
  • Cuba Gooding, Jr. (2004)
  • Jamie Foxx (2005)
  • Samuel L. Jackson (2006)
  • Forest Whitaker (2007)
  • Denzel Washington (2008)
  • Will Smith (2009)
  • Morgan Freeman (2010)
  • Denzel Washington (2011)
  • Laz Alonso (2012)
  • Denzel Washington (2013)
  • Forest Whitaker (2014)
  • David Oyelowo (2015)
  • Michael B. Jordan (2016)
  • Denzel Washington (2017)
  • Daniel Kaluuya (2018)
  • v
  • t
  • e
New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor
  • Charles Laughton (1935)
  • Walter Huston (1936)
  • Paul Muni (1937)
  • James Cagney (1938)
  • James Stewart (1939)
  • Charlie Chaplin (1940)
  • Gary Cooper (1941)
  • James Cagney (1942)
  • Paul Lukas (1943)
  • Barry Fitzgerald (1944)
  • Ray Milland (1945)
  • Laurence Olivier (1946)
  • William Powell (1947)
  • Laurence Olivier (1948)
  • Broderick Crawford (1949)
  • Gregory Peck (1950)
  • Arthur Kennedy (1951)
  • Ralph Richardson (1952)
  • Burt Lancaster (1953)
  • Marlon Brando (1954)
  • Ernest Borgnine (1955)
  • Kirk Douglas (1956)
  • Alec Guinness (1957)
  • David Niven (1958)
  • James Stewart (1959)
  • Burt Lancaster (1960)
  • Maximilian Schell (1961)
  • No award (1962)
  • Albert Finney (1963)
  • Rex Harrison (1964)
  • Oskar Werner (1965)
  • Paul Scofield (1966)
  • Rod Steiger (1967)
  • Alan Arkin (1968)
  • Jon Voight (1969)
  • George C. Scott (1970)
  • Gene Hackman (1971)
  • Laurence Olivier (1972)
  • Marlon Brando (1973)
  • Jack Nicholson (1974)
  • Jack Nicholson (1975)
  • Robert De Niro (1976)
  • John Gielgud (1977)
  • Jon Voight (1978)
  • Dustin Hoffman (1979)
  • Robert De Niro (1980)
  • Burt Lancaster (1981)
  • Ben Kingsley (1982)
  • Robert Duvall (1983)
  • Steve Martin (1984)
  • Jack Nicholson (1985)
  • Bob Hoskins (1986)
  • Jack Nicholson (1987)
  • Jeremy Irons (1988)
  • Daniel Day-Lewis (1989)
  • Robert De Niro (1990)
  • Anthony Hopkins (1991)
  • Denzel Washington (1992)
  • David Thewlis (1993)
  • Paul Newman (1994)
  • Nicolas Cage (1995)
  • Geoffrey Rush (1996)
  • Peter Fonda (1997)
  • Nick Nolte (1998)
  • Richard Farnsworth (1999)
  • Tom Hanks (2000)
  • Tom Wilkinson (2001)
  • Daniel Day-Lewis (2002)
  • Bill Murray (2003)
  • Paul Giamatti (2004)
  • Heath Ledger (2005)
  • Forest Whitaker (2006)
  • Daniel Day-Lewis (2007)
  • Sean Penn (2008)
  • George Clooney (2009)
  • Colin Firth (2010)
  • Brad Pitt (2011)
  • Daniel Day-Lewis (2012)
  • Robert Redford (2013)
  • Timothy Spall (2014)
  • Michael Keaton (2015)
  • Casey Affleck (2016)
  • Timothée Chalamet (2017)
  • v
  • t
  • e
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role
  • Tom Hanks (1994)
  • Nicolas Cage (1995)
  • Geoffrey Rush (1996)
  • Jack Nicholson (1997)
  • Roberto Benigni (1998)
  • Kevin Spacey (1999)
  • Benicio del Toro (2000)
  • Russell Crowe (2001)
  • Daniel Day-Lewis (2002)
  • Johnny Depp (2003)
  • Jamie Foxx (2004)
  • Philip Seymour Hoffman (2005)
  • Forest Whitaker (2006)
  • Daniel Day-Lewis (2007)
  • Sean Penn (2008)
  • Jeff Bridges (2009)
  • Colin Firth (2010)
  • Jean Dujardin (2011)
  • Daniel Day-Lewis (2012)
  • Matthew McConaughey (2013)
  • Eddie Redmayne (2014)
  • Leonardo DiCaprio (2015)
  • Denzel Washington (2016)
  • Gary Oldman (2017)
  • v
  • t
  • e
Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Play
  • José Ferrer / Fredric March (1947)
  • Henry Fonda / Paul Kelly / Basil Rathbone (1948)
  • Rex Harrison (1949)
  • Sidney Blackmer (1950)
  • Claude Rains (1951)
  • José Ferrer (1952)
  • Tom Ewell (1953)
  • David Wayne (1954)
  • Alfred Lunt (1955)
  • Paul Muni (1956)
  • Fredric March (1957)
  • Ralph Bellamy (1958)
  • Jason Robards, Jr. (1959)
  • Melvyn Douglas (1960)
  • Zero Mostel (1961)
  • Paul Scofield (1962)
  • Arthur Hill (1963)
  • Alec Guinness (1964)
  • Walter Matthau (1965)
  • Hal Holbrook (1966)
  • Paul Rogers (1967)
  • Martin Balsam (1968)
  • James Earl Jones (1969)
  • Fritz Weaver (1970)
  • Brian Bedford (1971)
  • Cliff Gorman (1972)
  • Alan Bates (1973)
  • Michael Moriarty (1974)
  • John Kani and Winston Ntshona (1975)
  • John Wood (1976)
  • Al Pacino (1977)
  • Barnard Hughes (1978)
  • Tom Conti (1979)
  • John Rubinstein (1980)
  • Ian McKellen (1981)
  • Roger Rees (1982)
  • Harvey Fierstein (1983)
  • Jeremy Irons (1984)
  • Derek Jacobi (1985)
  • Judd Hirsch (1986)
  • James Earl Jones (1987)
  • Ron Silver (1988)
  • Philip Bosco (1989)
  • Robert Morse (1990)
  • Nigel Hawthorne (1991)
  • Judd Hirsch (1992)
  • Ron Leibman (1993)
  • Stephen Spinella (1994)
  • Ralph Fiennes (1995)
  • George Grizzard (1996)
  • Christopher Plummer (1997)
  • Anthony LaPaglia (1998)
  • Brian Dennehy (1999)
  • Stephen Dillane (2000)
  • Richard Easton (2001)
  • Alan Bates (2002)
  • Brian Dennehy (2003)
  • Jefferson Mays (2004)
  • Bill Irwin (2005)
  • Richard Griffiths (2006)
  • Frank Langella (2007)
  • Mark Rylance (2008)
  • Geoffrey Rush (2009)
  • Denzel Washington (2010)
  • Mark Rylance (2011)
  • James Corden (2012)
  • Tracy Letts (2013)
  • Bryan Cranston (2014)
  • Alex Sharp (2015)
  • Frank Langella (2016)
  • Kevin Kline (2017)
  • Andrew Garfield (2018)
Authority control
  • WorldCat Identities
  • BIBSYS: 90966984
  • BNE: XX1091396
  • BNF: cb139319412 (data)
  • GND: 119540606
  • ISNI: 0000 0001 2148 4663
  • LCCN: n90694553
  • LNB: 000245324
  • MusicBrainz: 9cf98102-5bf5-4c56-a99c-3900f3b76693
  • NDL: 01126315
  • NKC: jx20050516009
  • SNAC: w6s1886b
  • SUDOC: 052198146
  • VIAF: 115428569


 
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