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Tee Martin
landed Tee Higgins, Amari Rodgers". Knoxville News Sentinel. Retrieved 26 July 2017.  "Tee Martin". LinkedIn. Retrieved 26 July 2017.  "Tee Martin

View Wikipedia Article

Tee MartinUSC TrojansPosition: Offensive coordinatorPersonal informationBorn: (1978-07-25) July 25, 1978 (age 40)
Mobile, AlabamaHeight: 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)Weight: 225 lb (102 kg)Career informationHigh school: Williamson (Mobile, Alabama)College: TennesseeNFL Draft: 2000 / Round: 5 / Pick: 163Career history As player:
  • Pittsburgh Steelers (2000–2001)
  • Rhein Fire (2002)
  • Philadelphia Eagles (2002)*
  • Oakland Raiders (2003)
  • Winnipeg Blue Bombers (2004–2005)
 * Offseason and/or practice squad member onlyAs coach:
  • Morehouse (PGQ) (2006)
  • North Cobb HS (PGC/QB) (2007)
  • North Atlanta HS (OC/QB) (2008)
  • New Mexico (QB) (2009)
  • Kentucky (WR) (2010)
  • Kentucky (PGC/WR) (2011)
  • USC (WR) (2012–2013)
  • USC (PGC/WR) (2014–2015)
  • USC (OC/WR) (2016–Present)
Career highlights and awards

As player:

  • BCS national champion (1998)
  • 2× SEC champion (1997, 1998)
Career NFL statistics Completion %: 37.5TD–INT: 0–1Passing yards: 69Passer rating: 25.3Rushing yards: 26 Player stats at NFL.comCareer CFL statistics Completion %: 42.1TD–INT: 1–4Passing yards: 458Passer rating: 43.2Rushing yards: 64

Tamaurice Nigel "Tee" Martin (born July 25, 1978) is the current offensive coordinator and wide receivers coach for USC and was the starting quarterback for the Tennessee Volunteers during their 1998 national championship season, and also played in the National Football League and Canadian Football League.

Contents
  • 1 Early years
  • 2 College career
    • 2.1 Collegiate statistics
  • 3 Professional career
  • 4 Coaching career
  • 5 Personal life
  • 6 References
  • 7 External links
Early years

Martin attended and played high school football at Williamson High School.[1]

College career

While at the University of Tennessee, Martin played college football under head coach Phillip Fulmer from 1996 to 1999 Martin was a backup to Peyton Manning during his freshman and sophomore years at the University of Tennessee.[2]. During his junior season, Martin led the 1998 Tennessee Volunteers football team to a 13–0 record and a Fiesta Bowl victory over Florida State, winning the school its first NCAA Division I-A national football championship since 1951.[3][4] He was teammates with running back Jamal Lewis in his early years at Tennessee and wide receiver Peerless Price, who each went on to play in the NFL.[5]

In the 1998 season, Martin broke the NCAA record for consecutive completions.[3] Against South Carolina, Martin completed his first 23 passes. Combined with a completion on his last pass the previous week against Alabama, Martin's string of 24 consecutive completions and 95.8% completion percentage set new records. Martin broke the Southeastern Conference record of Ole Miss' Kent Austin, which was 20 consecutive. He broke the NCAA record for completions over multiple games with 23 consecutive over two games, which was shared by Southern Cal's Rob Johnson and Maryland's Scott Milanovich. In addition, he broke the one-game record of 22 straight completions set by Iowa's Chuck Long in 1984. Lastly, his 95.8% completion percentage broke the previous best single-game completion percentage of 92.6% set by UCLA's Rick Neuheisel in 1983.[6]

In 1999, Martin led the Vols to their second consecutive BCS bowl, a 31–21 loss to #3 Nebraska in the Fiesta Bowl.[7] During Martin's two years as a starter at Tennessee, the Vols were 11-1 over six major conference foes, (2–0 vs. Alabama, 2–0 vs. Auburn, 2–0 vs. Georgia, 2–0 vs. Vanderbilt, 2-0 vs. Kentucky, and 1–1 vs. Florida).

Collegiate statistics Year School Conf Pos G Cmp Att Pct Yds Y/A AY/A TD Int Rate 1996 Tennessee SEC QB 11 2 4 50.0 24 6.0 6.0 0 0 100.4 1997 Tennessee SEC QB 4 6 12 50.0 87 7.3 5.2 1 1 121.7 1998 Tennessee SEC QB 12 153 267 57.3 2,164 8.1 8.5 19 6 144.4 1999 Tennessee SEC QB 11 165 305 54.1 2,317 7.6 7.1 12 9 125.0 Career Tennessee 326 588 55.4 4,592 7.8 7.7 32 16 133.6 Professional career

Martin was drafted in the fifth round with the 163rd overall pick in the 2000 NFL Draft by the Pittsburgh Steelers.[8] In 2004, Martin retired as a member of the Oakland Raiders after four NFL seasons. Martin spent one season in the NFL Europe league.[3] During the 2002 season, he helped lead the Rhein Fire to a league best 7–3 record. The Fire lost in the World Bowl, falling 20–26 to the Berlin Thunder.[9]

As one of six quarterbacks chosen before All-Pro New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady in the 2000 NFL Draft, Martin was profiled in the 2011 ESPN documentary, "Brady 6".[10]

Coaching career

After one year as quarterbacks coach at New Mexico under Mike Locksley,[11] Martin accepted the wide receivers coaching position at the University of Kentucky to join new head coach Joker Phillips.[12]

In February 2012, Martin was announced as the new wide receivers coach for the University of Southern California under head coach Lane Kiffin. He had been linked with jobs at both Alabama and Oregon previously. News of his hiring at USC was broken by a tweet by quarterback Matt Barkley.[13] Martin replaced Ted Gilmore who left to take a job at the Oakland Raiders.[14] As of 2017, Martin is the offensive coordinator for the Trojans under head coach Clay Helton.[15]

Personal life

Martin was born and raised in Mobile, Alabama. He is now[when?] married to the former Toya Rodriguez, a recording artist known professionally as Toya.[3] His oldest child, Amari Rodgers, plays college football at Clemson University.[16]

Martin owns Playmakers Sports, a company specializing in sports event planning, quarterback training, and skills development[17] and is a college football expert on Comcast Sports Southeast program Talkin' Football.[18] He is a quarterback coach for the Nike Elite 11 Quarterback Camps, Nike Football Training Camps, and has trained many high school and Division 1 quarterbacks.[19] In 2008, Martin created the "Dual Threat" Quarterback Camp and Academy in Atlanta, Georgia.[20]

References
  1. ^ "From Mobile to Los Angeles, USC's Tee Martin has charted his own course". ABC News. 2016-08-26. Retrieved 2018-08-22. 
  2. ^ Dufresne, Chris (1999-01-03). "The Tee in Tennessee". Los Angeles Times. ISSN 0458-3035. Retrieved 2018-08-22. 
  3. ^ a b c d "Tee Martin bio". University of Kentucky. Archived from the original on February 17, 2010. Retrieved February 12, 2010. 
  4. ^ "TENNESSEE GOES OUT ON TOP". Washington Post. 1999-01-05. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved 2018-08-22. 
  5. ^ "1998 Tennessee Volunteers Roster". Sports Reference. Retrieved 26 July 2017. 
  6. ^ "No. 3 Vols, Martin Blast S.C." CBS News. October 31, 1998. Retrieved 26 July 2017. 
  7. ^ "1999 Tennessee Volunteers Schedule and Results". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 2018-08-22. 
  8. ^ "Tee Martin". Pro-Footbal-Reference.Com. Retrieved November 10, 2012. 
  9. ^ "NFL Europe/WLAF Seasons". The Football Database. Retrieved 26 July 2017. 
  10. ^ Gaines, Cork (January 22, 2017). "The 6 quarterbacks drafted before Tom Brady in the infamous 2000 NFL Draft". Business Insider. Retrieved 26 July 2017. 
  11. ^ "New Mexico Fits Martin to a Tee". Albuquerque Journal. March 22, 2009. Retrieved 26 July 2017. 
  12. ^ "Tee Martin Joins UK Football Staff". Kentucky Wildcats. Retrieved 26 July 2017. 
  13. ^ "Reports: USC to hire Tee Martin as WR coach". Orange County Register. February 15, 2012. Retrieved 26 July 2017. 
  14. ^ McKinney, Eric. "Source -- Ted Gilmore leaves USC Trojans for Oakland Raiders job". ESPN.com. Retrieved 26 July 2017. 
  15. ^ Klein, Gary (December 18, 2015). "USC promotes Tee Martin to offensive coordinator - LA Times". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 26 July 2017. 
  16. ^ Thomas, Chris (January 30, 2017). "How Clemson football landed Tee Higgins, Amari Rodgers". Knoxville News Sentinel. Retrieved 26 July 2017. 
  17. ^ "Tee Martin". LinkedIn. Retrieved 26 July 2017. 
  18. ^ "Tee Martin Joins UK Football Staff". Kentucky Wildcats Athletics. Retrieved 26 July 2017. 
  19. ^ "Tee Martin". University of Southern California Athletics. Retrieved 26 July 2017. 
  20. ^ "USC football: Tee Martin is officially on board". Orange County Register. February 23, 2012. Retrieved 26 July 2017. 
External links
  • Winnipeg Blue Bombers bio (from 2005)
  • v
  • t
  • e
Tennessee Volunteers starting quarterbacks
  • Howard Ijams (1891–1893)
  • D. C. Chapman (1896)
  • C. L. Bryan (1899)
  • J. G. Logan (1900)
  • Sax Crawford (1901–1902)
  • J. C. Loucks (1906)
  • Chauncey Raulston (1909)
  • Rufus Branch (1909–1912)
  • Red Rainey (1913)
  • Bill May (1914–1915)
  • Buck Hatcher (1916)
  • Willis McCabe (1919)
  • Joe Evans (1920)
  • Roe Campbell (1921–1924)
  • Jimmie Smith (1922)
  • Billy Harkness (1924–1926)
  • Jimmy Elmore (1927)
  • D. Vincent Tudor (1927–1929)
  • Roy Witt (1928)
  • Bobby Dodd (1928–1930)
  • Deke Brackett (1931–1932)
  • Beattie Feathers (1933)
  • Charles Vaughan (1934)
  • Phil Dickens (1935–1936)
  • Walter Wood (1937)
  • George Cafego (1938–1939)
  • Van Thompson (1940)
  • Johnny Butler (1941)
  • Jim Gaffney (1943)
  • Buist Warren (1943–1944)
  • Walter Slater (1946)
  • Art Galiffa (1964–1966)
  • Dewey Warren (1967)
  • Bubba Wyche (1968)
  • Bobby Scott (1969–1970)
  • Condredge Holloway (1973–1974)
  • Randy Wallace (1975–1976)
  • Pat Ryan (1977)
  • Jimmy Streater (1978–1979)
  • Steve Alatorre (1980–1981)
  • Alan Cockrell (1981–1983)
  • Tony Robinson (1984–1985)
  • Jeff Francis (1987–1988)
  • Sterling Henton (1989)
  • Andy Kelly (1989–1991)
  • Heath Shuler (1992–1993)
  • Jerry Colquitt (1994)
  • Todd Helton (1994)
  • Peyton Manning (1994–1997)
  • Tee Martin (1998–1999)
  • A. J. Suggs (2000)
  • Casey Clausen (2000–2003)
  • Brent Schaeffer (2004)
  • Rick Clausen (2004–2005)
  • Erik Ainge (2004–2007)
  • Jonathan Crompton (2006, 2008–2009)
  • Nick Stephens (2008)
  • Matt Simms (2010–2011)
  • Tyler Bray (2010–2012)
  • Justin Worley (2013–2014)
  • Nathan Peterman (2013–2014)
  • Joshua Dobbs (2013–2016)
  • Quinten Dormady (2017)
  • Jarrett Guarantano (2017)
  • Will McBride (2017)
  • v
  • t
  • e
1998 Tennessee Volunteers football—consensus national champions
  • Will Bartholomew
  • Shawn Bryson
  • Chad Clifton
  • Cosey Coleman
  • Jeremaine Copeland
  • Shaun Ellis
  • Dwayne Goodrich
  • Deon Grant
  • Jeff Hall
  • John Henderson
  • Travis Henry
  • Bernard Jackson
  • Jamal Lewis
  • Andre Lott
  • David Martin
  • Rashad Moore
  • Tee Martin
  • Will Overstreet
  • Eric Parker
  • Peerless Price
  • Leonard Scott
  • Travis Stephens
  • Dominique Stevenson
  • Raynoch Thompson
  • Darwin Walker
  • Fred Weary
  • Eric Westmoreland
  • Keyon Whiteside
  • Al Wilson
  • Cedrick Wilson
  • Head coach: Phillip Fulmer
  • Assistant coaches: Mike Barry
  • John Chavis
  • David Cutcliffe
  • Ryan Held
  • Condredge Holloway
  • Kevin Ramsey
  • Randy Sanders
  • v
  • t
  • e
Pittsburgh Steelers 2000 NFL draft selections
  • Plaxico Burress
  • Marvel Smith
  • Kendrick Clancy
  • Hank Poteat
  • Danny Farmer
  • Clark Haggans
  • Tee Martin
  • Chris Combs
  • Jason Gavadza
  • v
  • t
  • e
Rhein Fire starting quarterbacks
  • Gino Torretta (1995)
  • Andy Kelly (1995–1996)
  • Terry Dean (1996)
  • T. J. Rubley (1997)
  • Josh LaRocca (1997)
  • Mike Quinn (1998)
  • Jim Arellanes (1998–1999)
  • Mike Cherry (1999)
  • Danny Wuerffel (2000)
  • Giovanni Carmazzi (2001)
  • Phil Stambaugh (2001)
  • Tee Martin (2002)
  • Nick Rolovich (2003)
  • Chad Hutchinson (2004)
  • Greg Zolman (2004)
  • Andy Hall (2005)
  • Scott McBrien (2005)
  • Drew Henson (2006)
  • Timmy Chang (2006)
  • Cody Pickett (2007)
  • v
  • t
  • e
Winnipeg Blue Bombers starting quarterbacks
  • Dobler
  • Hiney
  • Hood
  • Sandberg
  • Hobson
  • Gardiner
  • Lozanski
  • Jacobs
  • Petrow
  • Zaleski
  • Thompson
  • Crain
  • Leake
  • Hooper
  • Day
  • Ploen
  • Van Pelt
  • Cole
  • Ledyard
  • Thornton
  • Badar
  • Van Burkleo
  • Schneider
  • Weiss
  • Gabler
  • Johnson
  • Dial
  • Jonas
  • Ealey
  • Brock
  • Knight
  • Jackson
  • N. Hall
  • Gibbs
  • Clements
  • Hufnagel
  • Dewalt
  • Muecke
  • Salisbury
  • Saltz
  • Burgess
  • McManus
  • Dunigan
  • Garza
  • McCant
  • Slack
  • Moore
  • McDougal
  • Austin
  • Vargas
  • Rubley
  • Mason
  • Kopp
  • Bell
  • Jones
  • Ah Yat
  • Barnes
  • Glenn
  • Martin
  • Quinn
  • Dinwiddie
  • LeFors
  • Bishop
  • Pierce
  • Jyles
  • Brink
  • Elliott
  • Goltz
  • M. Hall
  • Willy
  • Brohm
  • Marve
  • Nichols
  • Davis
  • Streveler


 
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