Greg Floyd
Greg Floyd


Greg Floyd Jr.
top-100 2017 recruit Greg Floyd Jr". MLive. Retrieved June 14, 2018. Ferguson, Ashton (June 15, 2016). "Desert Pines' Greg Floyd to transfer to Middlebrooks

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Greg Floyd Jr.Free agentPositionSmall forwardPersonal informationBorn (1999-05-10) May 10, 1999 (age 21)
Las Vegas, NevadaNationalityAmericanListed height6 ft 9 in (2.06 m)Listed weight200 lb (91 kg)Career informationHigh school CollegeAntelope Valley CC (2017–2018)NBA draft2019 / UndraftedPlaying career2018–presentCareer history2018Los Angeles Ballers Career highlights and awards

Gregory Floyd Jr. (born May 10, 1999) is an American professional basketball player who last played for the Los Angeles Ballers of the Junior Basketball Association (JBA). He played for three different schools at the high school level, emerging as a four-star recruit and one of the top-ranked prospects in Nevada while at Desert Pines High School in Las Vegas. Despite receiving several NCAA Division I offers, he was considered academically ineligible after his grades plummeted due to the death of his sister, continuing his career at Antelope Valley College before moving to the JBA.

Contents High school career

Floyd began his high school years at Ed W. Clark High School in Las Vegas, Nevada, earning few minutes as a freshman, but helping his team win the Division I-A state title. On January 19, 2014, he scored a season-high 10 points against Western High School.[1] Floyd continued to see limited playing time in his sophomore season with Clark, causing him to transfer to Desert Pines High School in Las Vegas. However, he was ruled ineligible to play for his new school in his second year.[1] He rapidly rose in profile leading up to and during his junior season at Desert Pines.[1]

At the Pangos Spring Spectacular in April 2015, with his Las Vegas Knicks travel team, Floyd averaged 15.5 points, 10.3 rebounds and 5.2 assists, prompting offers from various colleges, including Seton Hall and USC.[1][2][3] He held initial offers from several mid-major programs.[3] In July, recruiting website Rivals.com included Floyd among eight "breakout players" at the Under Armour All-America Camp.[4]

For the 2015–16 season, the Las Vegas Sun considered Desert Pines, led by Floyd, as the favorite to win the Division I-A state championship.[5] By the beginning of his junior season, Floyd held over 20 scholarship offers, despite his meager experience at the varsity level.[6] He scored 25 points and grabbed 13 rebounds on December 15, 2015, in a win over Sunrise Mountain High School.[7] By February 2016, he was averaging 15 points, 8 rebounds, and 3 assists, gaining offers from Georgia, Pittsburgh, and Washington.[8] On September 7, 2016, rated a four-star recruit, Floyd committed to play college basketball at Long Beach State.[9][10]

In June 2016, it was announced that Floyd would reclassify to the class of 2018 and transfer to Middlebrooks Academy in Los Angeles, California.[11] After that season concluded, he received scholarship offers from NCAA Division I programs New Orleans and Cal State Bakersfield before committing to join NCAA Division I program Long Beach State.[12] However, he lost his NCAA Division I scholarship offers when his grades plummeted following the death of his sister.[13]

College career

In his freshman season of college, Floyd played at Antelope Valley College in Lancaster, California, competing in the California Community College Athletic Association (CCCAA).[14] On December 2, 2017, in the first round of the Gregg Anderson Memorial Tournament, he posted 32 points against El Camino College, shooting 13-of-16 from the field.[15] In the season, Floyd averaged 15.5 points, 7.6 rebounds, and 0.8 assists in 18.5 minutes per game.[14]

Professional career Los Angeles Ballers (2018)

In April 2018, Floyd was chosen at a tryout as one of the first seven players to play for the Los Angeles Ballers of the Junior Basketball Association (JBA).[16][17] In his professional debut alongside the league, Floyd recorded 34 points and a game-high 17 rebounds in a 134–124 win over the New York Ballers.[18] Three days later, he recorded 31 points and a league record high 33 rebounds in a 150–145 win over the Seattle Ballers.[19] On July 11, 2018, Floyd had 32 points and 19 rebounds in a high-scoring, 171–140 game against the Philadelphia Ballers.[20] He was later named to the West roster for the JBA All-Star Game.[21] He recorded 8 points and 8 rebounds to help top-seeded Los Angeles defeat the Seattle Ballers in the championship game.[22]

After the JBA season, Floyd was named to the JBA USA Team, which would play 28 exhibition games against various European and Asian professional teams from September to December 2018.[23] In his opening game versus Danish team Svendborg Rabbits, he collected 7 points and 7 rebounds and scored the game-winning basket with 0.3 second left in regulation.[24] After three games as part of the overseas tour, he was released from the JBA on October 3, 2018 along with teammates Cameron Clark and JaMicheal Morgan.[25]

Personal life

Floyd has stated that he draws inspiration on the basketball court from his sister Monique Gittens, who died on December 8, 2014, at age 24.[1] He said, "I don't really let it bring me down during the game; I use it as motivation, to do it for her. Play for her and play for my family."[1]

References
  1. ^ a b c d e f Schoen, David (July 21, 2015). "Greg Floyd Jr. emerges as area's top prospect". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved June 13, 2018..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output .citation q{quotes:"\"""\"""'""'"}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-free a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free a{background-image:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png");background-image:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Lock-green.svg");background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size:9px;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-registration a{background-image:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png");background-image:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg");background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size:9px;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription a{background-image:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png");background-image:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg");background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size:9px;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a{background-image:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg/12px-Wikisource-logo.svg.png");background-image:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg");background-repeat:no-repeat;background-size:12px;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{display:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0.3em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .citation .mw-selflink{font-weight:inherit}
  2. ^ Meyer, Jerry (April 12, 2015). "USC offers promising 2017 prospect". 247Sports. Retrieved June 13, 2018.
  3. ^ a b McManus, Chris (April 13, 2015). "Seton Hall offers Greg Floyd Jr". SHU Hoops. Retrieved June 13, 2018.
  4. ^ Bossi, Eric (July 7, 2015). "Eight breakout players". Rivals. Retrieved June 13, 2018.
  5. ^ Brewer, Ray (November 26, 2015). "Preseason Top 10: Gorman basketball No. 1; other valley teams close behind". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved June 14, 2018.
  6. ^ Granger, Jesse (November 29, 2015). "Desert Pines basketball determined to make amends for loss in state title game". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved June 14, 2018.
  7. ^ "Galang helps Tech break 36-game losing streak". Nevada Preps. December 15, 2015. Retrieved June 14, 2018.
  8. ^ McDonald, Dan (February 23, 2016). "Floyd turning heads during junior season". Rivals. Retrieved June 14, 2018.
  9. ^ Foster, Brandon (April 18, 2016). "2018 Wyoming target: Greg Floyd". Casper Star-Tribune. Retrieved June 13, 2018.
  10. ^ Quinn, Brendan F. (May 28, 2015). "Michigan lands upcoming visit from top-100 2017 recruit Greg Floyd Jr". MLive. Retrieved June 14, 2018.
  11. ^ Ferguson, Ashton (June 15, 2016). "Desert Pines' Greg Floyd to transfer to Middlebrooks Academy, reclassify to class of 2018". Nevada Preps.
  12. ^ "Greg Floyd, 6'9", 200, Forward, Freshman". melgru23. Retrieved June 14, 2018.
  13. ^ Washington, Jesse (July 6, 2018). "LaVar Ball's pro league is a last chance for hoop dreams". The Undefeated. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  14. ^ a b "Gregory Floyd Jr". Antelope Valley College. Retrieved June 14, 2018.
  15. ^ "Warriors Fall to Antelope Valley in Tournament Opener". ECC Warriors. December 2, 2017. Retrieved June 14, 2018.
  16. ^ Procter, Scott (April 17, 2018). "Junior Basketball Association aims to rival NCAA". The Spectator. Retrieved June 14, 2018.
  17. ^ Martin, Josh (April 9, 2018). "LaVar Ball's JBA league to feature 4-star recruit on LA Ballers". Lonzo Wire. Retrieved June 14, 2018.
  18. ^ https://lonzowire.usatoday.com/2018/06/21/lamelo-ball-los-angeles-ballers-beat-new-york-134-124-in-jba-debut/
  19. ^ https://lonzowire.usatoday.com/2018/06/24/lamelo-ball-fouls-out-los-angeles-ballers-beat-seattle-jba/
  20. ^ Martin, Josh (July 12, 2018). "LiAngelo, LaMelo Ball both triple-double in LA's 171-140 JBA win vs Philly". Lonzo Wire. Retrieved July 15, 2018.
  21. ^ "JBA All-Star Game". JBA League. Retrieved August 1, 2018.
  22. ^ Alvarez, Manny (August 15, 2018). "Los Angeles Ballers defeat Seattle to take first ever JBA League Title". Junior Basketball Association. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  23. ^ Alvarez, Manny (September 18, 2018). "JBA USA set for Denmark opener". Junior Basketball Association. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  24. ^ Alvarez, Manny (September 22, 2018). "Floyd Jr. seals JBA USA comeback victory in Denmark". Junior Basketball Association. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  25. ^ https://jbaleague.com/jba-usa-news-and-notes-10-4-18/


 
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