Tom Friedman
Tom Friedman
Thank You for Being Late: An Optimist's Guide to Thriving in the Age of Accelerations
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A New York Times Bestseller A field guide to the twenty-first century, written by one of its most celebrated observersWe all sense it―something big is going on. You feel it in your workplace. You feel it when you talk to your kids. You can’t miss it when you read the newspapers or watch the news. Our lives are being transformed in so many realms all at once―and it is dizzying. In Thank You for Being Late, a work unlike anything he has attempted before, Thomas L. Friedman exposes the tectonic movements that are reshaping the world today and explains how to get the most out of them and cushion their worst impacts. You will never look at the world the same way again after you read this book: how you understand the news, the work you do, the education your kids need, the investments your employer has to make, and the moral and geopolitical choices our country has to navigate will all be refashioned by Friedman’s original analysis. Friedman begins by taking us into his own way of looking at the world―how he writes a column. After a quick tutorial, he proceeds to write what could only be called a giant column about the twenty-first century. His thesis: to understand the twenty-first century, you need to understand that the planet’s three largest forces―Moore’s law (technology), the Market (globalization), and Mother Nature (climate change and biodiversity loss)―are accelerating all at once. These accelerations are transforming five key realms: the workplace, politics, geopolitics, ethics, and community. Why is this happening? As Friedman shows, the exponential increase in computing power defined by Moore’s law has a lot to do with it. The year 2007 was a major inflection point: the release of the iPhone, together with advances in silicon chips, software, storage, sensors, and networking, created a new technology platform. Friedman calls this platform “the supernova”―for it is an extraordinary release of energy that is reshaping everything from how we hail a taxi to the fate of nations to our most intimate relationships. It is creating vast new opportunities for individuals and small groups to save the world―or to destroy it. Thank You for Being Late is a work of contemporary history that serves as a field manual for how to write and think about this era of accelerations. It’s also an argument for “being late”―for pausing to appreciate this amazing historical epoch we’re passing through and to reflect on its possibilities and dangers. To amplify this point, Friedman revisits his Minnesota hometown in his moving concluding chapters; there, he explores how communities can create a “topsoil of trust” to anchor their increasingly diverse and digital populations. With his trademark vitality, wit, and optimism, Friedman shows that we can overcome the multiple stresses of an age of accelerations―if we slow down, if we dare to be late and use the time to reimagine work, politics, and community. Thank You for Being Late is Friedman’s most ambitious book―and an essential guide to the present and the future.
 
1,000 Unforgettable Senior Moments: Of Which We Could Remember Only 254
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The president who left the nuclear launch codes in a suit at the dry cleaners. The novelist who put the orange juice outside and the kitten in the refrigerator. The Russian general who left home in full military dress . . . minus his pants. The famous sex goddess who blew the same line through 52 takes. And the rock star who no longer remembers 1975. Filled with classic lapses, gaffes, and mental bloopers, 1,000 Unforgettable Senior Moments is a fabulous and witty gift for anyone of a certain age. And now it is updated, revised with more than 20 percent new stories, and repackaged in two color, making it an even more vibrant, visually appealing, fresh, and compellingly readable book. Anyone who’s ever had a mental lapse will empathize with relative spring chicken Nicki Minaj, who, while accepting a BET Viewers’ Choice Award, forgot why she was receiving the statuette (on live national television, no less). Or the team of astrophysicists who believed they had discovered proof of alien life—only to discover the signals were coming from the lunchroom microwave. Here’s a best man forgetting to show up at the wedding, a musician leaving his priceless cello in a cab, the bank robber who wrote a holdup note on a paycheck stub that had his name and address printed on it, and the Fox studio chief who, when pressed by his leading lady to remember her name, offered “. . . Cleopatra?”  
 
1,000 Unforgettable Senior Moments: Of Which We Could Remember Only 246
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No, you’re not losing your mind. And you’re definitely not alone. There’s Jimmy Carter, forgetting the nuclear launch codes in a suit at the dry cleaners. Rod Stewart fumbling for the name of the intense first love who inspired “Maggie Mae.” G. K. Chesterton writing a long letter to hismother announcing the good news about his engagement―while his mother is in the room with him. Marilyn Monroe blowing the same line through 52 takes during the filming of Some Like It Hot.Celebrating history’s greatest mental lapses, is a perfect impulse book in the fine gift format of Famous Last Words. Not just outlandishly funny, it’s also a book of great comfort―after all, having a senior moment puts you in the company of Einstein, Lincoln, Beethoven, Newton, Toscanini, and a whole assortment of presidents, poets, philosophers, popes, and Nobel Prize–winners. Talk about gaffes. Here are best men forgetting to show up at the wedding. Judges staggered by the incompetence of their previous decisions. Senators frozen in front of TV cameras. Olympic officials gazing absently while bewildered runners continue through the finish line. Bono losing the only copy of his lyrics to a new album. Forget to pick up your copy today!
 
Tom Friedman: Up In the Air
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A unique insight into Tom Friedman’s largest artwork made for a solo exhibition. One of the most influential artists of our time, Tom Friedman transforms everyday objects such as toothpicks and toilet paper into extraordinary works of art. Up in the Air consists of nearly a thousand meticulously handcrafted objects from a major retrospective at Magasin 3 Stockholm Konsthall.
 
Tom Friedman
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With the skills of a master craftsman, the obsessiveness of a teenage model-airplane builder, and the sense of humor and world view of a conceptual, self-defeatist prankster, Tom Friedman constructs works of art that defy cynical, uptight abstractionists and bored, foggy-eyed slouchers. Here is a man who carved his self-portrait out of an aspirin tablet; who built a standing figure, over a meter tall, out of sugar cubes; who suspended a perfect pink sphere in the corner of a room by making it out of thousands of pieces of bubble gum (which kept it stuck there just right); and who created an ephemeral floor sculpture using red eraser shavings from who knows how many pencils. And let's not forget the perfectly detailed, to-scale sculptures of spiders, flies, and bees that seem to simply alight on the corner of a museum pedestal. Or the minty-blue monochrome wall-work made entirely of toothpaste. Or the piece of paper that had been stared at for 1,000 hours. In this hefty two-volume set, which comes slipped together in a quirky, tactile case, Friedman's anti-monumental oeuvre is presented in two parts. First comes an artist's book, conceived by Friedman himself and containing drawings, photographs and sketches. Book number two is a thorough catalogue in which the whole of the artist's output is described and analyzed, accompanied by his own writings and essays by Robert Storr, John Miller, Glenn D. Lowry, Dennis Cooper and John Waters, amongst others.
 
The World Is Flat 3.0: A Brief History of the Twenty-first Century
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A New Edition of the Phenomenal #1 Bestseller"One mark of a great book is that it makes you see things in a new way, and Mr. Friedman certainly succeeds in that goal," the Nobel laureate Joseph E. Stiglitz wrote in The New York Times reviewing The World Is Flat in 2005. In this new edition, Thomas L. Friedman includes fresh stories and insights to help us understand the flattening of the world. Weaving new information into his overall thesis, and answering the questions he has been most frequently asked by parents across the country, this third edition also includes two new chapters--on how to be a political activist and social entrepreneur in a flat world; and on the more troubling question of how to manage our reputations and privacy in a world where we are all becoming publishers and public figures.The World Is Flat 3.0 is an essential update on globalization, its opportunities for individual empowerment, its achievements at lifting millions out of poverty, and its drawbacks--environmental, social, and political, powerfully illuminated by the Pulitzer Prize--winning author of The Lexus and the Olive Tree.
 
From Beirut to Jerusalem
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This revised edition of the number-one bestseller and winner of the 1989 National Book Award includes the Pulitzer Prize Winning author's new, updated epilogue.
 
The Lexus and the Olive Tree: Understanding Globalization
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"A brilliant guide for the here and now."---The New York Times Book ReviewIn this vivid portrait of the new business world, Thomas L. Friedman shows how technology, capital, and information are transforming the global marketplace, leveling old geographic and geopolitical boundaries. With bold reporting and acute analysis, Friedman dramatizes the conflict between globalizing forces and local cultures, and he shows why a balance between progress and the preservation of ancient traditions will ensure a better future for all. The Lexus and the Olive Tree is an indispensable look at power and big change in the age of globalization.
 
Tom Friedman
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This book is devoted to Tom Friedman’s exceptional body of work over the past nineteen years. Starting with commonplace objects like plastic cups, construction paper and Hefty garbage bags, this prolific artist transforms the often overlooked into playfully philosophical works that are ordinary and extraordinary at the same time. Friedman forces his viewers to reconsider the criteria for what is called “art” by exploring the material qualities of the object and the experiential process of making art through repetition, mutation, and dimension. While his work can demand a level of trust and reflection, it often rewards the viewer by sparking a childlike curiosity that sets one free to the beautifully endless potential of the everyday. The book features over 250 color illustrations and encompasses 200 artworks that reflect Friedman’s humor, his painstaking craftsmanship, and the unending inventiveness that distinguishes his work. 
 
The Undoing Project: A Friendship That Changed Our Minds
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How a Nobel Prize–winning theory of the mind altered our perception of reality.Forty years ago, Israeli psychologists Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky wrote a series of breathtakingly original studies undoing our assumptions about the decision-making process. Their papers showed the ways in which the human mind erred, systematically, when forced to make judgments in uncertain situations. Their work created the field of behavioral economics, revolutionized Big Data studies, advanced evidence-based medicine, led to a new approach to government regulation, and made much of Michael Lewis’s own work possible. Kahneman and Tversky are more responsible than anybody for the powerful trend to mistrust human intuition and defer to algorithms.The Undoing Project is about a compelling collaboration between two men who have the dimensions of great literary figures. They became heroes in the university and on the battlefield―both had important careers in the Israeli military―and their research was deeply linked to their extraordinary life experiences. Amos Tversky was a brilliant, self-confident warrior and extrovert, the center of rapt attention in any room; Kahneman, a fugitive from the Nazis in his childhood, was an introvert whose questing self-doubt was the seedbed of his ideas. They became one of the greatest partnerships in the history of science, working together so closely that they couldn’t remember whose brain originated which ideas, or who should claim credit. They flipped a coin to decide the lead authorship on the first paper they wrote, and simply alternated thereafter.This story about the workings of the human mind is explored through the personalities of two fascinating individuals so fundamentally different from each other that they seem unlikely friends or colleagues. In the process they may well have changed, for good, mankind’s view of its own mind.
 
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